Title

The Educational and Job Attainment Effects of Mentoring on Central Washington University Students

Presenter Information

Reality Cummings

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Youth Outcomes, Mentor Program, Youth Programs

Abstract

Do individuals who have been mentored tend to have a higher rate of success in education and other areas of their lives? Youth need positive, consistent relationships with caring adults to help them develop healthy behaviors in life. If the relationship does not happen naturally, mentoring programs can be employed to support youth by promoting positive youth outcomes. Having a better understanding of the differences in outcomes between mentored and non-mentored individuals is important in helping determine whether a mentoring program could be an option for Central Washington University. It was hypothesized that formal and non-formal mentoring affects most individuals positively and encourages youth to pursue success educationally and in their careers. A two-page, self-administered, anonymous questionnaire was distributed to 39 Central Washington University students regarding mentoring. Results showed that sixty percent of the participants in this study who had a mentor reported a higher grade point average, on average, than their non-mentored counterparts. Results also indicate a positive correlation between having had a mentor and currently being employed full-time or part-time. Seventy percent of respondents who reported having had a mentor maintained full-time or part-time employment. A greater understanding of preventative measures that influence children positively is vital in impacting their lives. These results support the addition of youth mentoring programs by administrators faced with decision-making regarding what type of programs to implement to improve outcomes for youth. These results may also assist with marketing efforts to recruit youth into existing mentorship programs. Further research should utilize a more diverse sample.

Poster Number

43

Faculty Mentor(s)

Heather Bell

Department/Program

Family and Consumer Sciences

Additional Mentoring Department

Family and Consumer Sciences

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May 21st, 2:30 PM May 21st, 5:00 PM

The Educational and Job Attainment Effects of Mentoring on Central Washington University Students

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Do individuals who have been mentored tend to have a higher rate of success in education and other areas of their lives? Youth need positive, consistent relationships with caring adults to help them develop healthy behaviors in life. If the relationship does not happen naturally, mentoring programs can be employed to support youth by promoting positive youth outcomes. Having a better understanding of the differences in outcomes between mentored and non-mentored individuals is important in helping determine whether a mentoring program could be an option for Central Washington University. It was hypothesized that formal and non-formal mentoring affects most individuals positively and encourages youth to pursue success educationally and in their careers. A two-page, self-administered, anonymous questionnaire was distributed to 39 Central Washington University students regarding mentoring. Results showed that sixty percent of the participants in this study who had a mentor reported a higher grade point average, on average, than their non-mentored counterparts. Results also indicate a positive correlation between having had a mentor and currently being employed full-time or part-time. Seventy percent of respondents who reported having had a mentor maintained full-time or part-time employment. A greater understanding of preventative measures that influence children positively is vital in impacting their lives. These results support the addition of youth mentoring programs by administrators faced with decision-making regarding what type of programs to implement to improve outcomes for youth. These results may also assist with marketing efforts to recruit youth into existing mentorship programs. Further research should utilize a more diverse sample.