Title

Effects of Fluorescent and Natural Lighting on Auditory Working Memory Tasks

Presenter Information

Madison Dion

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Working Memory, Lighting, Environmental Psychology

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to assess if there are differences in working memory in fluorescent lighting settings compared to naturally lit settings as well as to evaluate if there are any differences in male and female working memory in these lighting environments. Previous research has suggested that there are some gender differences in neurological activity during working memory tasks, and that students in naturally lit school settings tend to have better long-term cognitive performance than their counterparts in fluorescently lit classroom settings. Data on working memory will be collected using four standardized auditory subtests from the TOMAL-2. Based on previously conducted research, the current study hypothesizes that female participants will outperform male participants in all four working memory subtests and that both males and females will perform better in naturally lit environmental conditions than in the florescent lighting conditions.

Poster Number

46

Faculty Mentor(s)

Ralf Greenwald

Department/Program

Psychology

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

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May 21st, 2:30 PM May 21st, 5:00 PM

Effects of Fluorescent and Natural Lighting on Auditory Working Memory Tasks

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

The purpose of this research is to assess if there are differences in working memory in fluorescent lighting settings compared to naturally lit settings as well as to evaluate if there are any differences in male and female working memory in these lighting environments. Previous research has suggested that there are some gender differences in neurological activity during working memory tasks, and that students in naturally lit school settings tend to have better long-term cognitive performance than their counterparts in fluorescently lit classroom settings. Data on working memory will be collected using four standardized auditory subtests from the TOMAL-2. Based on previously conducted research, the current study hypothesizes that female participants will outperform male participants in all four working memory subtests and that both males and females will perform better in naturally lit environmental conditions than in the florescent lighting conditions.