Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Music, Cognition, Reaction Times

Abstract

Previous research investigating working memory functioning between musicians and non-musicians has demonstrated differences related to music experience in auditory reaction tasks. This body of research suggests music experience may be related to faster reaction times to auditory stimuli. In addition to reaction times recorded by clicking a mouse while listening to a tonal oddball, participants in the current study performed six subtests of the TOMAL-2, a standardized measure of working memory ability, documenting participants visual, auditory, and executive functioning modules of working memory. Our hypotheses are that means of performance on all three subtests of the TOMAL-2 will be higher in the musician group compared to non-musicians, and that musicians will, on average, record faster reaction times to various tonal difference conditions. Results of the current study will contribute to the understanding of differences in cognitive processing related to long-term music experience.

Poster Number

51

Faculty Mentor(s)

Ralf Greenwald

Department/Program

Psychology

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

Included in

Psychology Commons

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May 21st, 2:30 PM May 21st, 5:00 PM

Auditory Reaction Time and Behavioral Working Memory Differences Between Musicians and Non-Musicians

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Previous research investigating working memory functioning between musicians and non-musicians has demonstrated differences related to music experience in auditory reaction tasks. This body of research suggests music experience may be related to faster reaction times to auditory stimuli. In addition to reaction times recorded by clicking a mouse while listening to a tonal oddball, participants in the current study performed six subtests of the TOMAL-2, a standardized measure of working memory ability, documenting participants visual, auditory, and executive functioning modules of working memory. Our hypotheses are that means of performance on all three subtests of the TOMAL-2 will be higher in the musician group compared to non-musicians, and that musicians will, on average, record faster reaction times to various tonal difference conditions. Results of the current study will contribute to the understanding of differences in cognitive processing related to long-term music experience.