Presenter Information

Meghan Gilbert

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Gender, Perceived Stress, College Students

Abstract

Previous research on stress in adults demonstrates that stress, even perceived stress, can take a toll on an individual’s health. Research also indicates that the severity of stress in college students has been rapidly increasing, which indicates a need for more investigation in this area. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference between the stress levels of male and female college students and, if so, whether there is another factor involved that can account for this difference. The participants consisted of students attending Brigham Young University who were also active members of The Church of Jesus Christ Latter-Day Saints (152 women, 91 men) between the ages of 18 and 38 years (M=20.3, SD= 3.27). The participants were recruited through the Department of Psychology’s online research participation system and took an online survey. When participants were asked if the amount of stress they experienced was greater than they perceived other college students’ stress to be, females were more likely to agree than males. Neither relationship status, nor having a ruminative explanatory style, could account for the difference. Implications of this research are discussed.

Poster Number

62

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jesse James

Department/Program

Psychology

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

Included in

Psychology Commons

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May 21st, 2:30 PM May 21st, 5:00 PM

The Relationship Between Gender and Perceived Stress Levels in College Students

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Previous research on stress in adults demonstrates that stress, even perceived stress, can take a toll on an individual’s health. Research also indicates that the severity of stress in college students has been rapidly increasing, which indicates a need for more investigation in this area. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference between the stress levels of male and female college students and, if so, whether there is another factor involved that can account for this difference. The participants consisted of students attending Brigham Young University who were also active members of The Church of Jesus Christ Latter-Day Saints (152 women, 91 men) between the ages of 18 and 38 years (M=20.3, SD= 3.27). The participants were recruited through the Department of Psychology’s online research participation system and took an online survey. When participants were asked if the amount of stress they experienced was greater than they perceived other college students’ stress to be, females were more likely to agree than males. Neither relationship status, nor having a ruminative explanatory style, could account for the difference. Implications of this research are discussed.