Title

Hydrogen Peroxide Production in the Presence of Soot and Biological Electron Donors

Presenter Information

Jeff Barnes

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Soot, Nanoparticle, Hydrogen Peroxide

Abstract

The detrimental effects of carbonaceous nanoparticles emitted from fuel combustion are well known, but their underlying chemical mechanisms are not. Particle toxicity is generally thought to stem from the in vivo production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the details remain tenuous. Here, experiments were carried out to investigate the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an ROS, as a function of soot characteristics and redox-active iron content in the presence of biological electron donors. At biologically representative concentrations, results show that the presence of soot is essential in the continuous production of H2O2 at concentrations on the order of hundreds of nM and that a small redox-active pool of iron may be responsible for the conversion of H2O2 to a more potent ROS, hydroxyl radical (OH). Further investigation on the role of particle characteristics is underway. Data from this study are likely to lead to a better understanding of the reactivity and transformation of carbonaceous particles in a variety of settings.

Poster Number

29

Faculty Mentor(s)

Anne Johansen, Dan Hinz

Department/Program

Chemistry

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 21st, 8:30 AM May 21st, 11:00 AM

Hydrogen Peroxide Production in the Presence of Soot and Biological Electron Donors

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

The detrimental effects of carbonaceous nanoparticles emitted from fuel combustion are well known, but their underlying chemical mechanisms are not. Particle toxicity is generally thought to stem from the in vivo production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the details remain tenuous. Here, experiments were carried out to investigate the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an ROS, as a function of soot characteristics and redox-active iron content in the presence of biological electron donors. At biologically representative concentrations, results show that the presence of soot is essential in the continuous production of H2O2 at concentrations on the order of hundreds of nM and that a small redox-active pool of iron may be responsible for the conversion of H2O2 to a more potent ROS, hydroxyl radical (OH). Further investigation on the role of particle characteristics is underway. Data from this study are likely to lead to a better understanding of the reactivity and transformation of carbonaceous particles in a variety of settings.