Title

Synthesis and Testing of Possible Antimicrobial Agents from Breakdown Products of Lasalocid A

Presenter Information

Parker Wilson
Alex Handley
Diana Baluca

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Antibiotic, Synthesis, Staphylococcus aureus

Abstract

Increased antibiotic resistance has led to increased demand for new antibiotic development. Completely synthetic libraries currently in production lack much of the structural complexity necessary for biological activity. This research focuses on the synthesis of natural product-like compound libraries. The products are derived from lasalocid, a naturally produced antibiotic primarily, used as an additive in cow feed. This parent material was selected for its large degree of structural complexity. A Baeyer-Villiger oxidation will be performed to isolate the most complex portion of the molecule. The functionality of this core scaffold will then be chemically modified. The resulting chemical products will then be tested for antibiotic activity against several pathogenic bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, the Gram-positive bacterial species responsible for staph infections, using a Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay.

Poster Number

33

Faculty Mentor(s)

P. Whitney Swain

Department/Program

Chemistry

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

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Synthesis and Testing of Possible Antimicrobial Agents from Breakdown Products of Lasalocid A

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Increased antibiotic resistance has led to increased demand for new antibiotic development. Completely synthetic libraries currently in production lack much of the structural complexity necessary for biological activity. This research focuses on the synthesis of natural product-like compound libraries. The products are derived from lasalocid, a naturally produced antibiotic primarily, used as an additive in cow feed. This parent material was selected for its large degree of structural complexity. A Baeyer-Villiger oxidation will be performed to isolate the most complex portion of the molecule. The functionality of this core scaffold will then be chemically modified. The resulting chemical products will then be tested for antibiotic activity against several pathogenic bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, the Gram-positive bacterial species responsible for staph infections, using a Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay.