Title

Effects of Immune Serum on Macrophage Infection with Leishmania

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Leishmania, Macrophage, Serum

Abstract

Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease caused by single-celled parasites in the genus Leishmania. More than 20 different species of Leishmania infect humans, with several occurring within the same geographical area. The disease is spread when an infected sand fly feeds on a susceptible mammalian host. Leishmania parasites are injected into the mammalian host during a blood meal; upon entry into the body, the parasites infect white blood cells, macrophages. Leishmaniasis symptoms vary and may elicit: no symptoms, skin sores, weight loss, fever, internal organ enlargement, or death depending on the species of parasite and susceptibility of the host. Previous experiments have shown that the susceptible BALB/c mouse, infected with a low dose of cutaneous L. major and challenged with L. infantum develop exacerbated disease with higher parasite burden relative to naive mice. The immune response generated to L. infantum had little notable difference between L. major exposed and naive mice. Cross-reactive antibodies were noted in both groups regardless of immune history. The present study focuses on the role of cross-reactive antibodies in uptake of Leishmania parasites by macrophages using immune serum containing antibodies. A mouse macrophage cell line was exposed to Leishmania parasites and either control serum or L. major-infected serum. Cells were exposed to parasites and serum for 24, 48, or 72 hours and then stained to visualize internal parasites. This study aims to reveal if preexisting antibodies to one species of Leishmania leads to the disease exacerbation seen upon exposure to a different species.

Poster Number

36

Faculty Mentor(s)

Gabrielle Stryker, Blaise Dondji

Department/Program

Biological Sciences

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 21st, 8:30 AM May 21st, 11:00 AM

Effects of Immune Serum on Macrophage Infection with Leishmania

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease caused by single-celled parasites in the genus Leishmania. More than 20 different species of Leishmania infect humans, with several occurring within the same geographical area. The disease is spread when an infected sand fly feeds on a susceptible mammalian host. Leishmania parasites are injected into the mammalian host during a blood meal; upon entry into the body, the parasites infect white blood cells, macrophages. Leishmaniasis symptoms vary and may elicit: no symptoms, skin sores, weight loss, fever, internal organ enlargement, or death depending on the species of parasite and susceptibility of the host. Previous experiments have shown that the susceptible BALB/c mouse, infected with a low dose of cutaneous L. major and challenged with L. infantum develop exacerbated disease with higher parasite burden relative to naive mice. The immune response generated to L. infantum had little notable difference between L. major exposed and naive mice. Cross-reactive antibodies were noted in both groups regardless of immune history. The present study focuses on the role of cross-reactive antibodies in uptake of Leishmania parasites by macrophages using immune serum containing antibodies. A mouse macrophage cell line was exposed to Leishmania parasites and either control serum or L. major-infected serum. Cells were exposed to parasites and serum for 24, 48, or 72 hours and then stained to visualize internal parasites. This study aims to reveal if preexisting antibodies to one species of Leishmania leads to the disease exacerbation seen upon exposure to a different species.