Presenter Information

Michael Balda

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Insects, Water, Burial

Abstract

Urban stream syndrome occurs when an urban area affects a stream system. Stream burial is common in urban systems, and burial blocks incoming light, potentially affecting available food resources and, in turn, affecting the insect communities. I tested for changes to the stream ecosystem as a result of urbanization by measuring insect community parameters upstream and downstream of buried sites in the three creeks in Ellensburg, Washington, that are affected by urban stream syndrome. I measured chlorophyll on rocks, total suspended sediments (TSS), fine benthic organic matter (FBOM), ammonium, and phosphorus to relate to insect communities characteristics. I hypothesized that there would be an overall significant difference between insect communities in the upstream and downstream sites. Each creek was tested at two sites, with an upstream and a downstream testing location, totaling twelve sample sites. To find the significance of the data, a paired t-test was used to find any significance between the upstream and the downstream sites. I found no significant difference in chlorophyll, FBOM, or TSS between the upstream and downstream sites, p = 0.92, p = 0.47, and p = 0.50, respectively. However, I did find higher phosphorus concentrations upstream of a buried stream segment compared to downstream, p = 0.048, implying net phosphorus uptake in the buried reach. The identification of the individual insects within their respected communities will show whether or not burial is affecting these communities.

Poster Number

37

Faculty Mentor(s)

Clay Arango

Department/Program

Environmental Studies

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 21st, 8:30 AM May 21st, 11:00 AM

Insect Communities: Ellensburg Upstream Versus Downstream Sites

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Urban stream syndrome occurs when an urban area affects a stream system. Stream burial is common in urban systems, and burial blocks incoming light, potentially affecting available food resources and, in turn, affecting the insect communities. I tested for changes to the stream ecosystem as a result of urbanization by measuring insect community parameters upstream and downstream of buried sites in the three creeks in Ellensburg, Washington, that are affected by urban stream syndrome. I measured chlorophyll on rocks, total suspended sediments (TSS), fine benthic organic matter (FBOM), ammonium, and phosphorus to relate to insect communities characteristics. I hypothesized that there would be an overall significant difference between insect communities in the upstream and downstream sites. Each creek was tested at two sites, with an upstream and a downstream testing location, totaling twelve sample sites. To find the significance of the data, a paired t-test was used to find any significance between the upstream and the downstream sites. I found no significant difference in chlorophyll, FBOM, or TSS between the upstream and downstream sites, p = 0.92, p = 0.47, and p = 0.50, respectively. However, I did find higher phosphorus concentrations upstream of a buried stream segment compared to downstream, p = 0.048, implying net phosphorus uptake in the buried reach. The identification of the individual insects within their respected communities will show whether or not burial is affecting these communities.