Title

Using Entangled Photons for Single Photon Interference

Presenter Information

Nathan Zimmerer

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Entangled, Photon, Interference

Abstract

Entangled photons and single photon interference are prime examples of quantum mechanics and are useful in evaluating the theory. To find entangled photons, an apparatus was built and optimized that used heralded detection. The apparatus produced entangled photons using a pump laser producing 474 nm radiation, and a ß-Barium Borate(BBO) crystal. The entangled 948 nm photons were produced in two separate beams arbitrarily known as signal and idler photons. Each beam was detected by an avalanche photodiode (APD). When the signal photons reached the APD, electronic pulses were produced and sent through a delay line, while electronic pulses from the idler photon APD were not. Then the pulses from the APDs were used as a start and stop for a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC). A multichannel analyzer was used to evaluate the TAC spectrum, and showed a large amount of coincidences at time intervals consistent with that of the delayed signal pulses. These coincidences provide evidence that the apparatus was producing entangled photons. After the apparatus was optimized, a double slit was placed in the path of the signal photons and used to search for heralded single photon interference. The results were inconclusive within measurement uncertainty.

Poster Number

52

Faculty Mentor(s)

Michael Braunstein

Department/Program

Physics

Additional Mentoring Department

Physics

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May 21st, 8:30 AM May 21st, 11:00 AM

Using Entangled Photons for Single Photon Interference

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Entangled photons and single photon interference are prime examples of quantum mechanics and are useful in evaluating the theory. To find entangled photons, an apparatus was built and optimized that used heralded detection. The apparatus produced entangled photons using a pump laser producing 474 nm radiation, and a ß-Barium Borate(BBO) crystal. The entangled 948 nm photons were produced in two separate beams arbitrarily known as signal and idler photons. Each beam was detected by an avalanche photodiode (APD). When the signal photons reached the APD, electronic pulses were produced and sent through a delay line, while electronic pulses from the idler photon APD were not. Then the pulses from the APDs were used as a start and stop for a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC). A multichannel analyzer was used to evaluate the TAC spectrum, and showed a large amount of coincidences at time intervals consistent with that of the delayed signal pulses. These coincidences provide evidence that the apparatus was producing entangled photons. After the apparatus was optimized, a double slit was placed in the path of the signal photons and used to search for heralded single photon interference. The results were inconclusive within measurement uncertainty.