Presenter Information

John-Paul Mann

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Astrophysics, Solar Physics, Solar Flares

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to investigate changes in the coronal loop structures during the life cycle of a solar flare. Coronal loops are intricate and complicated magnetic features on the solar surface that are the source of large solar flares. Understanding the dynamics of these coronal loops provides better models for predicting solar flare activity. By obtaining the magnetogram, or magnetic field strength, along with the inclination of these coronal loops, the full structure of the coronal loop can be obtained. Therefore, we studied how the coronal loops inclination angle, as it emerges from the photosphere, changes in response to variations of the magnetic field strength. Research data were used from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument aboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). Helioviewer, an online application, was used as a visual database for active region selection. Numerical data were then collected for each active region through the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) online by Stanford. Python coding language was implemented in order to manipulate these large data sets and images for multiple different solar active regions. A baseline for the relationship between magnetogram strength and inclination angle of a coronal loop was obtained by investigation of multiple active regions where no solar flares were present. Then, two active regions with multiple large X-class solar flares were investigated for magnetogram strength and inclination angle over time. These differences in inclination for the solar flare active regions versus the baseline active region are still being investigated.

Poster Number

57

Faculty Mentor(s)

Darci Snowden

Department/Program

Physics

Additional Mentoring Department

Physics

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May 21st, 8:30 AM May 21st, 11:00 AM

Investigating the Correlation Between Inclination of Coronal Loops and Solar Flare Activity

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

The purpose of this research is to investigate changes in the coronal loop structures during the life cycle of a solar flare. Coronal loops are intricate and complicated magnetic features on the solar surface that are the source of large solar flares. Understanding the dynamics of these coronal loops provides better models for predicting solar flare activity. By obtaining the magnetogram, or magnetic field strength, along with the inclination of these coronal loops, the full structure of the coronal loop can be obtained. Therefore, we studied how the coronal loops inclination angle, as it emerges from the photosphere, changes in response to variations of the magnetic field strength. Research data were used from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument aboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). Helioviewer, an online application, was used as a visual database for active region selection. Numerical data were then collected for each active region through the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) online by Stanford. Python coding language was implemented in order to manipulate these large data sets and images for multiple different solar active regions. A baseline for the relationship between magnetogram strength and inclination angle of a coronal loop was obtained by investigation of multiple active regions where no solar flares were present. Then, two active regions with multiple large X-class solar flares were investigated for magnetogram strength and inclination angle over time. These differences in inclination for the solar flare active regions versus the baseline active region are still being investigated.