Title

The Benefits of Adding Additional Fiber from Cellulose, White Wheat Flour Fiber, and Cottonseed to Zucchini Muffins

Presenter Information

Lindsey Bottman
Cassy Cannon
Megan Nealy

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Fiber, Muffin, Cellulose

Abstract

The number one cause of death in America is cardiovascular disease. To combat this, individuals can consume food products to increase their fiber intake to the recommended 25 grams per day. If a product contains at least 2.5 grams of fiber per serving, a company can claim that it is a good source of fiber. This experiment, conducted in February of 2015, aimed to increase fiber consumption by creating a good-source-of-fiber muffin without altering the taste. To do this, part of the whole wheat and all-purpose flour in the recipe were replaced with one of three International Fiber Corporation fiber powders. The powders used were White Wheat Fiber (WWF), Powdered Cellulose (FFC), and Cotton Seed (BVF). No significant differences, p<0.05, were subjectively determined between any of the three fibers compared to the control, BVF: n=32, WWF: n=32, FFC: n=60. Objective testing, p>0.05, n=18 for all tests/muffin types, showed a significant difference in mean penetration force between the control muffins compared to all three variable muffin types. Adding white whole wheat fiber and cotton seed fiber resulted in a softer muffin than the control, while powdered cellulose resulted in a harder muffin. There were no significant differences, p<0.05, n=18 for all tests/muffin types, in percent moisture content and mean withdrawal force between the variable muffins and the control muffins. Therefore, one can conclude that all three fibers create acceptable replacement muffins that are a good source of fiber

Poster Number

25

Faculty Mentor(s)

David Gee

Department/Program

Nutrition, Exercise & Health Science

Additional Mentoring Department

Nutrition, Exercise & Health Science

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May 21st, 11:30 AM May 21st, 2:00 PM

The Benefits of Adding Additional Fiber from Cellulose, White Wheat Flour Fiber, and Cottonseed to Zucchini Muffins

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

The number one cause of death in America is cardiovascular disease. To combat this, individuals can consume food products to increase their fiber intake to the recommended 25 grams per day. If a product contains at least 2.5 grams of fiber per serving, a company can claim that it is a good source of fiber. This experiment, conducted in February of 2015, aimed to increase fiber consumption by creating a good-source-of-fiber muffin without altering the taste. To do this, part of the whole wheat and all-purpose flour in the recipe were replaced with one of three International Fiber Corporation fiber powders. The powders used were White Wheat Fiber (WWF), Powdered Cellulose (FFC), and Cotton Seed (BVF). No significant differences, p<0.05, were subjectively determined between any of the three fibers compared to the control, BVF: n=32, WWF: n=32, FFC: n=60. Objective testing, p>0.05, n=18 for all tests/muffin types, showed a significant difference in mean penetration force between the control muffins compared to all three variable muffin types. Adding white whole wheat fiber and cotton seed fiber resulted in a softer muffin than the control, while powdered cellulose resulted in a harder muffin. There were no significant differences, p<0.05, n=18 for all tests/muffin types, in percent moisture content and mean withdrawal force between the variable muffins and the control muffins. Therefore, one can conclude that all three fibers create acceptable replacement muffins that are a good source of fiber