Title

Fluid Intake and Sweat Rate During Hot Yoga Participation

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Hydration, Sweat Rate, Hot Yoga

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the pre-exercise hydration status, fluid balance, perception of sweat loss, and sweat sodium loss in hot yoga participants. Methods: Male and female participants, n = 21, 33 ± 10.5 yr, 173.1 cm, mass: 70.7 ± 11.0 kg, were examined during a one-hour hot hatha yoga class, 38.7 ± 2.6°C, 36 ± 13 percent relative humidity. Urine specific gravity (USG) was measured to assess pre-exercise hydration status. Sweat rate was calculated using pre and post-session weight and fluid intake. Sweat sodium concentration was analyzed via a sweat patch sample. After the hot yoga session, participants were asked to fill an empty one liter container with the amount of water with which they perceived they lost as sweat during the class. A paired t test was used to identify significance between measured sweat loss and perceived sweat loss and Pearson’s correlation analyses were used to assess any relationship between selected variables, p≤0.05. Results: Seventy-six percent of participants began hot yoga euhydrated, USG<1.020. Sweat rate was 0.9 ± 0.6 L·h-1, and despite free access to fluids during class, consumption was low (0.2 ± 0.2 L·h-1), and 33 percent did not consume any fluids. Consequently, mean percent body mass loss was 0.9 ± 0.6 percent from pre-exercise body mass, and about half of the participants lost at least one percent of body mass. There was a significant difference between perception of sweat loss and measured loss, p=0.01. Mean sweat sodium concentration was 49.1 ± 19.2 mmol·L-1. Conclusion: These findings highlight the individual variability in hydration management among hot yoga participants. Therefore, a need for personalized hydration guidelines and individual education is warranted to prevent hypohydration.

Poster Number

28

Faculty Mentor(s)

Robert Pritchett

Department/Program

Nutrition, Exercise & Health Science

Additional Mentoring Department

Nutrition, Exercise & Health Science

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 21st, 11:30 AM May 21st, 2:00 PM

Fluid Intake and Sweat Rate During Hot Yoga Participation

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Purpose: To investigate the pre-exercise hydration status, fluid balance, perception of sweat loss, and sweat sodium loss in hot yoga participants. Methods: Male and female participants, n = 21, 33 ± 10.5 yr, 173.1 cm, mass: 70.7 ± 11.0 kg, were examined during a one-hour hot hatha yoga class, 38.7 ± 2.6°C, 36 ± 13 percent relative humidity. Urine specific gravity (USG) was measured to assess pre-exercise hydration status. Sweat rate was calculated using pre and post-session weight and fluid intake. Sweat sodium concentration was analyzed via a sweat patch sample. After the hot yoga session, participants were asked to fill an empty one liter container with the amount of water with which they perceived they lost as sweat during the class. A paired t test was used to identify significance between measured sweat loss and perceived sweat loss and Pearson’s correlation analyses were used to assess any relationship between selected variables, p≤0.05. Results: Seventy-six percent of participants began hot yoga euhydrated, USG<1.020. Sweat rate was 0.9 ± 0.6 L·h-1, and despite free access to fluids during class, consumption was low (0.2 ± 0.2 L·h-1), and 33 percent did not consume any fluids. Consequently, mean percent body mass loss was 0.9 ± 0.6 percent from pre-exercise body mass, and about half of the participants lost at least one percent of body mass. There was a significant difference between perception of sweat loss and measured loss, p=0.01. Mean sweat sodium concentration was 49.1 ± 19.2 mmol·L-1. Conclusion: These findings highlight the individual variability in hydration management among hot yoga participants. Therefore, a need for personalized hydration guidelines and individual education is warranted to prevent hypohydration.