Title

Eating Behaviors Associated with Higher Risk of Chronic Disease in Youth at Guam Summer Activity Camps

Presenter Information

Johanna Siler

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Guam, Diet, Youth

Abstract

This research assessed the eating behavior of sixth-to-twelfth grade participants in summer activity camps in Guam and aimed to correlate dietary patterns with chronic disease risk. Diets high in fat or sugar, and/or low in fruits and vegetables, are considered to be at a higher risk for obesity-related chronic diseases, such as Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is the third leading cause of death in Guam compared to seventh for the United States, overall. Additionally, the majority of youth in Guam report inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption. Due to the increased risk in this population, it is critical for research to identify behavioral strategies that may effectively reduce risk through low-risk dietary interventions. Participants included eight females and seven males, aged 9 to 13 years, and were recruited from Guam Youth Summer camps. The sample represented mainly Asian/Pacific Islander, Native Hawaiian, and White/Caucasian populations. Anthropometric and descriptive dietary data were obtained through food frequency questionnaires. Average body mass index (BMI) was 24.62 (weight ranged from 56 to 162 pounds). Data analysis revealed fruits and vegetables were consumed on average about one to three times a month. Reported fiber intake indicates low whole grain consumption. Additionally, fat consumption was 28 percent of total energy intake. Due to sample size, a correlation between chronic disease risk and dietary patterns was not identified. Additional research, including a larger sample size, to examine the associations and effects of specific dietary patterns of children living in Guam needs to be conducted.

Poster Number

33

Faculty Mentor(s)

Nicole Stendell-Hollis, Stefan Ward

Department/Program

Nutrition, Exercise & Health Science

Additional Mentoring Department

Nutrition, Exercise & Health Science

Additional Mentoring Department

Physical Education School and Public Health

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 21st, 11:30 AM May 21st, 2:00 PM

Eating Behaviors Associated with Higher Risk of Chronic Disease in Youth at Guam Summer Activity Camps

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

This research assessed the eating behavior of sixth-to-twelfth grade participants in summer activity camps in Guam and aimed to correlate dietary patterns with chronic disease risk. Diets high in fat or sugar, and/or low in fruits and vegetables, are considered to be at a higher risk for obesity-related chronic diseases, such as Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is the third leading cause of death in Guam compared to seventh for the United States, overall. Additionally, the majority of youth in Guam report inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption. Due to the increased risk in this population, it is critical for research to identify behavioral strategies that may effectively reduce risk through low-risk dietary interventions. Participants included eight females and seven males, aged 9 to 13 years, and were recruited from Guam Youth Summer camps. The sample represented mainly Asian/Pacific Islander, Native Hawaiian, and White/Caucasian populations. Anthropometric and descriptive dietary data were obtained through food frequency questionnaires. Average body mass index (BMI) was 24.62 (weight ranged from 56 to 162 pounds). Data analysis revealed fruits and vegetables were consumed on average about one to three times a month. Reported fiber intake indicates low whole grain consumption. Additionally, fat consumption was 28 percent of total energy intake. Due to sample size, a correlation between chronic disease risk and dietary patterns was not identified. Additional research, including a larger sample size, to examine the associations and effects of specific dietary patterns of children living in Guam needs to be conducted.