Document Type

Thesis

Date of Degree Completion

Summer 2018

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Family and Consumer Sciences

Committee Chair

Dr. Sarah Feeney

Second Committee Member

Dr. Duane Dowd

Third Committee Member

Dr. Amy Claridge

Abstract

This study examined the association between helicopter parenting and self-efficacy among emerging adults in college. While some existing research revealed that emerging adults could benefit from helicopter parenting, previous studies identified a wide range of negative outcomes of helicopter parenting on emerging adult’s psychological well-being. Also, previous research has shown that mothers and fathers play different roles in parenting. This study adds to understanding of this phenomenon by comparing the salience of mothers’ and fathers’ helicopter parenting as a predictor of self-efficacy among emerging adults in college. Data were collected from 175 participants between the ages of 18-24 by using an anonymous online survey shared on social media as well as in hard-copy format in university classrooms. Results revealed that there was a negative association between students’ reports of mothers’ helicopter parenting and their self-efficacy. No association was found between fathers’ helicopter parenting and students’ self-efficacy.

Available for download on Tuesday, October 08, 2019

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