Presenter Information

Hilary Hemmes-KavanaughFollow

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

http://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/

Start Date

18-5-2017

End Date

18-5-2017

Keywords

gray-shanked douc langur, semi-captive, EPRC, Vietnam

Abstract

In 2005 the Endangered Primate Rescue Center (Cúc Phương National Park, Vietnam) acquired 5ha of forest as a pre-release habitat for endangered primates. Our study assessed whether the pre-release habitat was suitable for the expression of grey-shanked douc (GSD) langurs’ (Pygathrix cinera) wild behavioral repertoire of substrate use. We categorized substrates as boughs, branches or twigs. We observed four langurs living in the pre-release habitat from 16-10-03 to 16-12-02 and compared results with wild GSD langurs. Both semi-captive and wild langurs used substrates at significantly varied proportions (semi-captive: χ2=68.36, df=2, P<0.0001; wild: χ2=704.4, df=2, P<0.0001) with branches being the most used substrate (semi-captive:71.71%; wild: 66.6%). Semi-captive langurs used twigs least (8.26%, n=263), and boughs were used moderately (20.03%, n=638). These results are dissimilar from wild GSD langurs who were observed using twigs and boughs at nearly equal proportions (twigs=17%, n=1,253; boughs=16%, n=1,204). The semi-captive groups’ use of substrate varied significantly from wild GSD langurs for resting (χ2=7.78, df=2, p = .0204), social (χ2= 26.48, df=2, p < .001) and travel behaviors (χ2= 12.75, df=2, p = .0017). There was no significant difference between semi-captive and wild GSD langurs’ substrate use when feeding (χ2=1.04, df=2, p = .5945). Both semi-captive and wild langurs used twigs for feeding behavior more often than they fed on other substrates. These results are congruent with the understanding of folivorous primates acquisition of young leaves, which are commonly found the canopy outer layer. Our results indicate that the semi-captive space encourages natural use of substrates by the langurs living within it.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Lori Sheeran

Department/Program

Primate Behavior and Ecology

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May 18th, 12:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 AM

Comparison of semi-captive and wild gray-shanked douc langurs’ (Pygathrix cinerea) substrate use

Ellensburg

In 2005 the Endangered Primate Rescue Center (Cúc Phương National Park, Vietnam) acquired 5ha of forest as a pre-release habitat for endangered primates. Our study assessed whether the pre-release habitat was suitable for the expression of grey-shanked douc (GSD) langurs’ (Pygathrix cinera) wild behavioral repertoire of substrate use. We categorized substrates as boughs, branches or twigs. We observed four langurs living in the pre-release habitat from 16-10-03 to 16-12-02 and compared results with wild GSD langurs. Both semi-captive and wild langurs used substrates at significantly varied proportions (semi-captive: χ2=68.36, df=2, P<0.0001; wild: χ2=704.4, df=2, P<0.0001) with branches being the most used substrate (semi-captive:71.71%; wild: 66.6%). Semi-captive langurs used twigs least (8.26%, n=263), and boughs were used moderately (20.03%, n=638). These results are dissimilar from wild GSD langurs who were observed using twigs and boughs at nearly equal proportions (twigs=17%, n=1,253; boughs=16%, n=1,204). The semi-captive groups’ use of substrate varied significantly from wild GSD langurs for resting (χ2=7.78, df=2, p = .0204), social (χ2= 26.48, df=2, p < .001) and travel behaviors (χ2= 12.75, df=2, p = .0017). There was no significant difference between semi-captive and wild GSD langurs’ substrate use when feeding (χ2=1.04, df=2, p = .5945). Both semi-captive and wild langurs used twigs for feeding behavior more often than they fed on other substrates. These results are congruent with the understanding of folivorous primates acquisition of young leaves, which are commonly found the canopy outer layer. Our results indicate that the semi-captive space encourages natural use of substrates by the langurs living within it.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2016/cos/14