Document Type

Poster

Location

Ellensburg

Event Website

http://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/

Start Date

18-5-2016

End Date

18-5-2016

Keywords

cross-cultural comparison; facial inference; nonverbal communication; Pakistan; Mechanical Turk

Abstract

Two different samples from Pakistan and the United States were asked to infer the emotions and personality traits shown in three facial expressions (angry, sad, happy) of young white females and males in six photographs. The two studies used Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) to investigate the facial inference process. Each picture was presented for 10 seconds followed by four questions about the individual in the picture. The first question asked participants to identify the emotion shown, from a list of six emotions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, surprise). The next three questions consist of condensed sets of the Big Five personality adjective markers (Saucier, 1994), the three Self-Assessment Manikin dimensions (SAM) (Bradley & Lang, 1994), and items related to attractiveness, perceived motivation and morality inferences.

Overall, the American sample showed significantly higher accuracy (above 67% except on Question 3 for both genders) in attributing the correct facial expression and personality traits across each picture for both genders compared to the Pakistan sample. The Pakistan sample showed the highest accuracy, above 70%, across the four questions for the happy female and male pictures. The lowest overall accuracy, below 65%, in the Pakistan sample was for the sad female and male pictures across each of the four questions.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Anthony Stahelski

Dr. Mary Radeke

Department/Program

Experimental Psychology Master's Program

 
May 18th, 12:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 AM

A Cultural Comparison of Two Facial Inference Studies

Ellensburg

Two different samples from Pakistan and the United States were asked to infer the emotions and personality traits shown in three facial expressions (angry, sad, happy) of young white females and males in six photographs. The two studies used Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) to investigate the facial inference process. Each picture was presented for 10 seconds followed by four questions about the individual in the picture. The first question asked participants to identify the emotion shown, from a list of six emotions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, surprise). The next three questions consist of condensed sets of the Big Five personality adjective markers (Saucier, 1994), the three Self-Assessment Manikin dimensions (SAM) (Bradley & Lang, 1994), and items related to attractiveness, perceived motivation and morality inferences.

Overall, the American sample showed significantly higher accuracy (above 67% except on Question 3 for both genders) in attributing the correct facial expression and personality traits across each picture for both genders compared to the Pakistan sample. The Pakistan sample showed the highest accuracy, above 70%, across the four questions for the happy female and male pictures. The lowest overall accuracy, below 65%, in the Pakistan sample was for the sad female and male pictures across each of the four questions.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2016/cos/8