Title

The Belfast Boycott: Gender, Partition, and Civil War

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

15-5-2019

End Date

15-5-2019

Abstract

The Belfast Boycott was a protest which ran from August 1920 until January 1922 that was designed to dislodge loyalism in Northern Ireland and punish its adherents for perceived intolerance toward Catholics. This paper analyzes three ways that the Belfast Boycott permeated and cemented civil war divisions. It examines the constructs of the boycott in relation to the issues of sectarianism, partition, and the role of women. For example, some members of the Dáil thought that the boycott would further solidify partition and thereby strengthen existing sectarian strife. Others saw the boycott as an opportunity to punish Loyalists for fidelity to a colonial power and for unfair treatment of Catholic workers. Advertisements were created to link boycott compliance with patriotism, assuring shoppers that only by boycotting Belfast could they help partition end. Boycotting allowed women, who were often marginalized by the political framework, an opportunity to make political statements through their economic actions. While it lasted only a year and a half, the Belfast Boycott can help us better understand and expound upon issues of sectarianism, partition, and gender roles and their contributive role in the Irish Civil War.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jason Knirck

Department/Program

History

The Belfast Boycott Omans, Katie SOURCE.pptm (7859 kB)
Slides for SOURCE 2019 presentation Omans

Additional Files

The Belfast Boycott Omans, Katie SOURCE.pptm (7859 kB)
Slides for SOURCE 2019 presentation Omans

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May 15th, 12:00 AM May 15th, 12:00 AM

The Belfast Boycott: Gender, Partition, and Civil War

Ellensburg

The Belfast Boycott was a protest which ran from August 1920 until January 1922 that was designed to dislodge loyalism in Northern Ireland and punish its adherents for perceived intolerance toward Catholics. This paper analyzes three ways that the Belfast Boycott permeated and cemented civil war divisions. It examines the constructs of the boycott in relation to the issues of sectarianism, partition, and the role of women. For example, some members of the Dáil thought that the boycott would further solidify partition and thereby strengthen existing sectarian strife. Others saw the boycott as an opportunity to punish Loyalists for fidelity to a colonial power and for unfair treatment of Catholic workers. Advertisements were created to link boycott compliance with patriotism, assuring shoppers that only by boycotting Belfast could they help partition end. Boycotting allowed women, who were often marginalized by the political framework, an opportunity to make political statements through their economic actions. While it lasted only a year and a half, the Belfast Boycott can help us better understand and expound upon issues of sectarianism, partition, and gender roles and their contributive role in the Irish Civil War.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2019/Oralpres/40