Title

Locating a new gene involved in behavioral adaptation to serotonin in the roundworm C. elegans

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

15-5-2019

End Date

15-5-2019

Abstract

Using the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, a genetic screen was performed to identify genes responsible for behavioral adaptation to chronic exposure to serotonin. When exposed to serotonin, C. elegans will slow their movement, eat more, and lay more eggs, but when they are exposed chronically, they adapt to those behaviors and regain speed, eat less, and lay fewer eggs in a process known as behavioral adaptation. One of the mutants, def-1, was found to not adapt to serotonin and has an additional behavioral phenotype we are studying. This social feeding behavior that has been previously uncharacterized is called “depressed foraging”. The specific purpose of this study is to determine the genetic location of a gene altered in def-1 worms. We are in process of using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) mapping to localize the mutation. We have localized it to Chromosome I, and are continuing to interval map to a more specific region on the chromosome. Once narrowed to several possible genes, we will sequence these genes to find the one with the mutation. Alternatively, we will use RNA interference techniques to inactivate these genes in wild-type worms in order to see if they mimic the phenotype of def-1 mutants. Another mutant from that original genetic screen, def-2 was found to have identical phenotypes and we are using complementation tests to determine if they have mutations in the same genes. Identifying genes regulating how worms develop adaptation will provide insight to this behavior is regulated at the cellular level.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Lucinda Carnell

Department/Program

Biological Sciences

BOYD_SOURCE_2019_14v19.pptx (7400 kB)
Slides for SOURCE 2019 presentation Boyd

Additional Files

BOYD_SOURCE_2019_14v19.pptx (7400 kB)
Slides for SOURCE 2019 presentation Boyd

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May 15th, 12:00 AM May 15th, 12:00 AM

Locating a new gene involved in behavioral adaptation to serotonin in the roundworm C. elegans

Ellensburg

Using the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, a genetic screen was performed to identify genes responsible for behavioral adaptation to chronic exposure to serotonin. When exposed to serotonin, C. elegans will slow their movement, eat more, and lay more eggs, but when they are exposed chronically, they adapt to those behaviors and regain speed, eat less, and lay fewer eggs in a process known as behavioral adaptation. One of the mutants, def-1, was found to not adapt to serotonin and has an additional behavioral phenotype we are studying. This social feeding behavior that has been previously uncharacterized is called “depressed foraging”. The specific purpose of this study is to determine the genetic location of a gene altered in def-1 worms. We are in process of using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) mapping to localize the mutation. We have localized it to Chromosome I, and are continuing to interval map to a more specific region on the chromosome. Once narrowed to several possible genes, we will sequence these genes to find the one with the mutation. Alternatively, we will use RNA interference techniques to inactivate these genes in wild-type worms in order to see if they mimic the phenotype of def-1 mutants. Another mutant from that original genetic screen, def-2 was found to have identical phenotypes and we are using complementation tests to determine if they have mutations in the same genes. Identifying genes regulating how worms develop adaptation will provide insight to this behavior is regulated at the cellular level.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2019/Oralpres/48