Title

Diet Quality Inversely Associated With Depression: NHanes 2011-2014

Presenter Information

Katherine St. John

Document Type

Poster

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

15-5-2019

End Date

15-5-2019

Abstract

Depression, also called major depressive disorder (MDD), major depression, or clinical depression, is a mood disorder known to cause decreased role functioning and quality of life. In a given year, an estimated 16 million U.S. adults experience a depressive episode. Less is known about the effect of diet quality and depressive symptoms. The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship between diet quality and self-reported depressive symptoms in a nationally representative sample of the U.S. population. Data for diet quality was based from self-reported 24-hour diet recalls obtained from trained interviewers using the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Automated Multiple Pass Method (AMPM). Diet quality was measured using the USDA’s Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2015. Symptoms of depression were assessed by trained interviewers using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Survey logistic regression models determined whether HEI-2015 scores differed between depressed and non-depressed adults after controlling for age, gender, poverty income ratio (PIR), and body mass index (BMI). Additional models examined the role of diet components. A total of 8,448 adults over the age of 20 were included in this study. The overall prevalence of depression in this sample was 9.27%. Compared to non-depressed adults (n=7,665), depressed adults (n=783) had a lower total HEI-2015 score, and a significant relationship was found between HEI-2015 and PHQ-9 scores. These results were significant even after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, and socioeconomic status.

Winner, Outstanding Poster Presentation, School of Graduate Studies and Research.

Faculty Mentor(s)

David Gee

Department/Program

Food Science and Nutrition

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May 15th, 12:00 AM May 15th, 12:00 AM

Diet Quality Inversely Associated With Depression: NHanes 2011-2014

Ellensburg

Depression, also called major depressive disorder (MDD), major depression, or clinical depression, is a mood disorder known to cause decreased role functioning and quality of life. In a given year, an estimated 16 million U.S. adults experience a depressive episode. Less is known about the effect of diet quality and depressive symptoms. The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship between diet quality and self-reported depressive symptoms in a nationally representative sample of the U.S. population. Data for diet quality was based from self-reported 24-hour diet recalls obtained from trained interviewers using the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Automated Multiple Pass Method (AMPM). Diet quality was measured using the USDA’s Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2015. Symptoms of depression were assessed by trained interviewers using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Survey logistic regression models determined whether HEI-2015 scores differed between depressed and non-depressed adults after controlling for age, gender, poverty income ratio (PIR), and body mass index (BMI). Additional models examined the role of diet components. A total of 8,448 adults over the age of 20 were included in this study. The overall prevalence of depression in this sample was 9.27%. Compared to non-depressed adults (n=7,665), depressed adults (n=783) had a lower total HEI-2015 score, and a significant relationship was found between HEI-2015 and PHQ-9 scores. These results were significant even after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, and socioeconomic status.

Winner, Outstanding Poster Presentation, School of Graduate Studies and Research.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2019/Posters/147