Title

Testing 3D Scanning & Printing for Making Reference Bone Specimens from Faunal Remains

Document Type

Poster

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

15-5-2019

End Date

15-5-2019

Abstract

Comparative faunal collections are important for both research and learning, but being used as learning tools puts faunal remains at greater risk of damage. To help make elements from comparative collections available for research and education, we examine if 3D scanning and printing are yet precise enough to generate comparable models of faunal remains. For such materials to be useful, they must be accurate to the original element, quick and cheap to make, and easily shared. By using online services to host scans, faunal remains become accessible to people all over the world who may not otherwise have certain specimens in their own comparative collections. Using an inexpensive 3D scanner, we generated scans of the stylohyoid bones of a domestic cattle and domestic sheep and assorted carpal bones (magnums and unciforms) of a domestic cattle, mountain goat, bighorn sheep, pronghorn, and mule deer. These scans were meshed to create a 3D model of each element, which were then printed using two different 3D printing methods. Bone measurements were taken to help quantify the accuracy of the prints to the original elements and test which features became most distorted in the scanning and printing process. We found that the scanner and printers used were not able to create sufficiently detailed replicas of faunal remains. After analyzing the inter-observer error with the metrics, dimensions of prints were often over 10% larger or smaller than the original elements, resulting in loss of shape and distinctive features comparable to the original faunal elements.

Winner, Outstanding Poster Presentation, College of the Sciences.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Patrick Lubinski

Department/Program

Anthropology and Museum Studies

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Testing 3D Scanning & Printing for Making Reference Bone Specimens from Faunal Remains

Ellensburg

Comparative faunal collections are important for both research and learning, but being used as learning tools puts faunal remains at greater risk of damage. To help make elements from comparative collections available for research and education, we examine if 3D scanning and printing are yet precise enough to generate comparable models of faunal remains. For such materials to be useful, they must be accurate to the original element, quick and cheap to make, and easily shared. By using online services to host scans, faunal remains become accessible to people all over the world who may not otherwise have certain specimens in their own comparative collections. Using an inexpensive 3D scanner, we generated scans of the stylohyoid bones of a domestic cattle and domestic sheep and assorted carpal bones (magnums and unciforms) of a domestic cattle, mountain goat, bighorn sheep, pronghorn, and mule deer. These scans were meshed to create a 3D model of each element, which were then printed using two different 3D printing methods. Bone measurements were taken to help quantify the accuracy of the prints to the original elements and test which features became most distorted in the scanning and printing process. We found that the scanner and printers used were not able to create sufficiently detailed replicas of faunal remains. After analyzing the inter-observer error with the metrics, dimensions of prints were often over 10% larger or smaller than the original elements, resulting in loss of shape and distinctive features comparable to the original faunal elements.

Winner, Outstanding Poster Presentation, College of the Sciences.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2019/Posters/240