Title

A Live-Streamed Revolution: Before and After the Camera Cuts

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

16-5-2021

End Date

22-5-2021

Keywords

BIPOC, Violence

Abstract

The history of the United States is a history of terrorism against Black, Indigenous People Of Color (BIPOC). From slavery, lynching, and Jim Crow for Blacks, genocide of Indigenous Peoples and theft of their land, to Japanese Internment, Chinese Head Tax and Zoot Suit riots, inhumane treatment of Latinos, the militarization of the border, bigotry, discrimination, and violence has been the historical rule, not the exception. While today there is not expressed racial discrimination in the law, there is violence of hate crimes shown in the recent mass shooting of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, border and inland internment, police brutality against African Americans and mass incarceration. This presentation is a response to the hate speech and rise in cultural erasure against marginalized people and the attempt to use domestic terrorism as a method of intimidation to silence their BIPOC bodies. These new young voices speak back, or speak a truth of living under the local news’ helicopter’s flashlight of domestic terrorism before and after the camera cuts. Winner, College of Arts and Humanities Presentation Award Winner.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Xavier Cavazos

Department/Program

Africana and Black Studies

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May 16th, 12:00 AM May 22nd, 12:00 AM

A Live-Streamed Revolution: Before and After the Camera Cuts

Ellensburg

The history of the United States is a history of terrorism against Black, Indigenous People Of Color (BIPOC). From slavery, lynching, and Jim Crow for Blacks, genocide of Indigenous Peoples and theft of their land, to Japanese Internment, Chinese Head Tax and Zoot Suit riots, inhumane treatment of Latinos, the militarization of the border, bigotry, discrimination, and violence has been the historical rule, not the exception. While today there is not expressed racial discrimination in the law, there is violence of hate crimes shown in the recent mass shooting of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, border and inland internment, police brutality against African Americans and mass incarceration. This presentation is a response to the hate speech and rise in cultural erasure against marginalized people and the attempt to use domestic terrorism as a method of intimidation to silence their BIPOC bodies. These new young voices speak back, or speak a truth of living under the local news’ helicopter’s flashlight of domestic terrorism before and after the camera cuts. Winner, College of Arts and Humanities Presentation Award Winner.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2021/CAH/2