Title

Motor Function Demo

Document Type

Poster

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

16-5-2021

End Date

22-5-2021

Keywords

Motors, Education, Control

Abstract

The uses, function, and differentiation of control in electrical motors is a topic that is difficult to grasp to the average onlooker. This project aims to lessen or remove this difficulty for those in the Electronics Engineering Technology program. This was determined to be through the movement and observation of four motors: a common DC motor, a mini servo motor, a stepper motor, and a shaded pole AC motor. From these four, data was measured in respect to what one wants out of each motor in their respective industry setting. For the DC and AC motors the RPM is measured in respect to their voltage input and input frequency, respectively. The stepper and servo motor have their current position measured and compared to their respective inputs. All of which is programmed accordingly in LabVIEW for the purposes of it being a more visual learning tool. This will allow any prospective EET majors or other student who have even a hint of interest in electrical motors a chance to interact with and understand how they work.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Lad Holden

Department/Program

Engineering Technologies, Safety, and Construction

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May 16th, 12:00 PM May 22nd, 12:00 PM

Motor Function Demo

Ellensburg

The uses, function, and differentiation of control in electrical motors is a topic that is difficult to grasp to the average onlooker. This project aims to lessen or remove this difficulty for those in the Electronics Engineering Technology program. This was determined to be through the movement and observation of four motors: a common DC motor, a mini servo motor, a stepper motor, and a shaded pole AC motor. From these four, data was measured in respect to what one wants out of each motor in their respective industry setting. For the DC and AC motors the RPM is measured in respect to their voltage input and input frequency, respectively. The stepper and servo motor have their current position measured and compared to their respective inputs. All of which is programmed accordingly in LabVIEW for the purposes of it being a more visual learning tool. This will allow any prospective EET majors or other student who have even a hint of interest in electrical motors a chance to interact with and understand how they work.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2021/CEPS/11