Title

RC Baja - Drivetrain & Steering

Document Type

Creative works or constructive object presentation

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

16-5-2021

End Date

22-5-2021

Keywords

RC Baja, brushless motor, chassis/suspension/drivetrain

Abstract

There was a need for an RC car that would turn the power of a brushless motor into torque to the wheels, in order for it to move forward and backward. The car needed to meet given requirements in order to compete in the annual American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) RC Baja competition. The team requirements were to reach a top speed of 20 mph, turn 60° in both directions, survive a three-foot drop, and spend no more than $500 total on the project. In order to meet the requirements, the device chosen was an RC Baja that had a floating rear end. The Baja was broken down into two categories, the drivetrain and steering, which was completed by the principal engineer, and the chassis and suspension which was completed by Colton Hague. The complete device was modeled in SolidWorks based off of a two-wheel drive floating rear end vehicle. The assembly was then broken down into sub-assemblies which had certain parts that were manufactured as well as purchased. The principal engineer and Colton combined the sub-assemblies at the end in order to construct the device, as it was built on SolidWorks. After successfully completing construction, several tests were done to determine if the Baja was ready to race. All requirements above were met, and the device successfully competed in the competition.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jeunghwan Choi and Charles Pringle

Department/Program

Engineering Technologies, Safety, and Construction

Additional Mentoring Department

https://cwu.studentopportunitycenter.com/rc-baja-drivetrain-steering/

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May 16th, 12:00 PM May 22nd, 12:00 PM

RC Baja - Drivetrain & Steering

Ellensburg

There was a need for an RC car that would turn the power of a brushless motor into torque to the wheels, in order for it to move forward and backward. The car needed to meet given requirements in order to compete in the annual American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) RC Baja competition. The team requirements were to reach a top speed of 20 mph, turn 60° in both directions, survive a three-foot drop, and spend no more than $500 total on the project. In order to meet the requirements, the device chosen was an RC Baja that had a floating rear end. The Baja was broken down into two categories, the drivetrain and steering, which was completed by the principal engineer, and the chassis and suspension which was completed by Colton Hague. The complete device was modeled in SolidWorks based off of a two-wheel drive floating rear end vehicle. The assembly was then broken down into sub-assemblies which had certain parts that were manufactured as well as purchased. The principal engineer and Colton combined the sub-assemblies at the end in order to construct the device, as it was built on SolidWorks. After successfully completing construction, several tests were done to determine if the Baja was ready to race. All requirements above were met, and the device successfully competed in the competition.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2021/CEPS/38