Title

Investigating the Effects of Sambucus nigra on the Adaptive Immune Response In Vivo

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

16-5-2021

End Date

22-5-2021

Keywords

IMMUNOLOGY, IN VIVO, ANTIBODY

Abstract

Elderberry extracts, obtained from the berries of the plant Sambucus nigra, are marketed as an immune stimulant and are widely available. Previous research has suggested that bioactive components of elderberry extract exhibit anti-inflammatory and, in other studies, pro-inflammatory effects in immune cells. Much of the body of research done with elderberry has involved in vitro studies. However, there are few in vivo studies of elderberry to date, which is the real test of immune bioactivity. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of a commercially available elderberry extract on the adaptive immune response. We carried out an in vivo study of BALB/c mice measuring their immune response to a foreign protein (ovalbumin (OVA)) while being dosed with elderberry. The mice were trained to eat gelatin to receive the elderberry and were then immunized with an adjuvant, with half receiving OVA in their immunization. Following immunization, the mice were given gelatin with or without elderberry for a period of 10 days to allow an immune response to be generated. After one-month, blood and immune cells were collected from the groups to measure the immune response generated to OVA. Both the T-cell and the B cell responses were measured with ELISAs. The T-cell responses were below detectable levels after a single immunization. The OVA-specific serum antibody levels were high and there was no significant difference in mice fed elderberry while developing an immune response to OVA. Thus, there was no demonstratable effect of elderberry on the adaptive immune response.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Gabrielle Stryker

Department/Program

Biological Sciences

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May 16th, 12:00 PM May 22nd, 12:00 PM

Investigating the Effects of Sambucus nigra on the Adaptive Immune Response In Vivo

Ellensburg

Elderberry extracts, obtained from the berries of the plant Sambucus nigra, are marketed as an immune stimulant and are widely available. Previous research has suggested that bioactive components of elderberry extract exhibit anti-inflammatory and, in other studies, pro-inflammatory effects in immune cells. Much of the body of research done with elderberry has involved in vitro studies. However, there are few in vivo studies of elderberry to date, which is the real test of immune bioactivity. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of a commercially available elderberry extract on the adaptive immune response. We carried out an in vivo study of BALB/c mice measuring their immune response to a foreign protein (ovalbumin (OVA)) while being dosed with elderberry. The mice were trained to eat gelatin to receive the elderberry and were then immunized with an adjuvant, with half receiving OVA in their immunization. Following immunization, the mice were given gelatin with or without elderberry for a period of 10 days to allow an immune response to be generated. After one-month, blood and immune cells were collected from the groups to measure the immune response generated to OVA. Both the T-cell and the B cell responses were measured with ELISAs. The T-cell responses were below detectable levels after a single immunization. The OVA-specific serum antibody levels were high and there was no significant difference in mice fed elderberry while developing an immune response to OVA. Thus, there was no demonstratable effect of elderberry on the adaptive immune response.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2021/COTS/18