Title

Plants of the Western United States: Expanding the Collection and Biological Testing of Extracts

Presenter Information

Fernando Galvan
Aaron John

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 137B

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

The goal of this research was to find compounds that could be used medicinally and potentially for other uses. Multidrug resistance describes the ability of a microorganism to resist antibiotics. Many microorganisms use a mechanism known as active efflux to move antibiotics out of cells.1,2 In this way, the effectiveness of an antibiotic is then reduced partially or completely, allowing the pathogen to survive. A major theme of this research was to look for compounds that inhibit active efflux processes that are related to multidrug resistance. After the diffusion of an antibiotic into a bacterial cell, an efflux pump inhibitor can prevent the antibiotic from being expelled from the organism, leading to rapid cell death. Efflux pump inhibitors may therefore be helpful to increase the potency and useful lifespan of antibiotics. We also screened for compounds showing neuropharmacological activity in a dopamine D1 radioligand binding/displacement assay. Dalea schottii and Collomia grandiflora were the major subjects of study in this research. Dalea schottii was collected in the Anza Borrego Desert of Southern California, while Collomia gradiflora was collected near Ellensburg, Washington. The collected plants were extracted with methanol in a heavy duty homogenizer. Next, compounds were separated and purified using several techniques of chromatography with bioassay guidance. Biological testing results pointed to the fractions, in which active compounds were located throughout the experimentation process. The structure elucidation process has started for the compounds isolated using carbon, proton, DEPT, and COSY NMR spectroscopy.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Gil Belofsky

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

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May 17th, 11:40 AM May 17th, 12:00 PM

Plants of the Western United States: Expanding the Collection and Biological Testing of Extracts

SURC 137B

The goal of this research was to find compounds that could be used medicinally and potentially for other uses. Multidrug resistance describes the ability of a microorganism to resist antibiotics. Many microorganisms use a mechanism known as active efflux to move antibiotics out of cells.1,2 In this way, the effectiveness of an antibiotic is then reduced partially or completely, allowing the pathogen to survive. A major theme of this research was to look for compounds that inhibit active efflux processes that are related to multidrug resistance. After the diffusion of an antibiotic into a bacterial cell, an efflux pump inhibitor can prevent the antibiotic from being expelled from the organism, leading to rapid cell death. Efflux pump inhibitors may therefore be helpful to increase the potency and useful lifespan of antibiotics. We also screened for compounds showing neuropharmacological activity in a dopamine D1 radioligand binding/displacement assay. Dalea schottii and Collomia grandiflora were the major subjects of study in this research. Dalea schottii was collected in the Anza Borrego Desert of Southern California, while Collomia gradiflora was collected near Ellensburg, Washington. The collected plants were extracted with methanol in a heavy duty homogenizer. Next, compounds were separated and purified using several techniques of chromatography with bioassay guidance. Biological testing results pointed to the fractions, in which active compounds were located throughout the experimentation process. The structure elucidation process has started for the compounds isolated using carbon, proton, DEPT, and COSY NMR spectroscopy.