Title

Women in Combat: The Combat Rescue Officer

Presenter Information

Natalie Rambish

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 137A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Currently there is a large ongoing debate about whether the United States military should be legally obligated to make jobs which are classified as combat positions available to females. My research takes a closer look at one of the Air Force’s Special Operations jobs, the Combat Rescue Officer. As a recently added combat position, women are not yet allowed to apply or compete for this job. The study discusses the positive and negative aspects that the Air Force would encounter if they opened this and other combat positions to women. I’ll advocate that without changing the current physical and mental requirements for acceptance into the field, women can and should be allowed to compete to be a Combat Rescue Officer. In addition to the question of mental and physical fitness for the job, my research also examines other issues that are specific to women in combat situations. Two issues examined in the study are the use of sexual abuse and misconduct toward female soldiers in prisoner of war type situations, and the impact of the human instinct on job performance in combat. I’ll present a few counter examples from real events that will serve as a testament to the fortitude of women, and their capabilities as war fighters. Exploratory and constructive research methods provide both the information and examples used to develop a strong argument for the rights of women to be permitted in combat jobs.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Thomas vonAhlefeld

Additional Mentoring Department

Aerospace Studies

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 17th, 11:40 AM May 17th, 12:00 PM

Women in Combat: The Combat Rescue Officer

SURC 137A

Currently there is a large ongoing debate about whether the United States military should be legally obligated to make jobs which are classified as combat positions available to females. My research takes a closer look at one of the Air Force’s Special Operations jobs, the Combat Rescue Officer. As a recently added combat position, women are not yet allowed to apply or compete for this job. The study discusses the positive and negative aspects that the Air Force would encounter if they opened this and other combat positions to women. I’ll advocate that without changing the current physical and mental requirements for acceptance into the field, women can and should be allowed to compete to be a Combat Rescue Officer. In addition to the question of mental and physical fitness for the job, my research also examines other issues that are specific to women in combat situations. Two issues examined in the study are the use of sexual abuse and misconduct toward female soldiers in prisoner of war type situations, and the impact of the human instinct on job performance in combat. I’ll present a few counter examples from real events that will serve as a testament to the fortitude of women, and their capabilities as war fighters. Exploratory and constructive research methods provide both the information and examples used to develop a strong argument for the rights of women to be permitted in combat jobs.