Title

Gender and Ethnic Differences in Learning and Study Strategies

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Saenz and Ponjuan (2009) stated that research on the experiences of Latino male college students is needed, especially considering the growing gender gap in educational attainment. Although an increasing number of Latino students are pursuing and graduating from college, the proportion of male Latino students continues to decline in comparison to women. One important aspect of the college experience is successfully employing adaptive learning and study strategies. In this study we explored gender differences in learning and study strategies for 106 white (41 men, 65 women) and 56 Mexican American (31 men, 25 women) undergraduates attending a mid-sized public university in the Pacific Northwest. Variables measured included control of learning beliefs, self-efficacy for learning and performance, peer learning, help seeking, and time and study environment. For white students no significant gender differences were found. However, for Mexican American students the multivariate effect of gender was significant, (Wilk’s lambda = .73, F= 3.24, P < .05, Partial Eta squared = .27). Follow-up tests revealed that men scored higher than females on self-efficacy for learning and performance and time study environment . The effect sizes for both were in the large range. These results add to our knowledge base regarding gender differences in learning and study strategies among students from diverse ethnic groups. In this sample, Mexican American men scored higher than women in the area of self-efficacy for learning and performance and time study environment.

Poster Number

23

Faculty Mentor(s)

Heath Marrs

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

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May 17th, 2:00 PM May 17th, 4:30 PM

Gender and Ethnic Differences in Learning and Study Strategies

SURC Ballroom A

Saenz and Ponjuan (2009) stated that research on the experiences of Latino male college students is needed, especially considering the growing gender gap in educational attainment. Although an increasing number of Latino students are pursuing and graduating from college, the proportion of male Latino students continues to decline in comparison to women. One important aspect of the college experience is successfully employing adaptive learning and study strategies. In this study we explored gender differences in learning and study strategies for 106 white (41 men, 65 women) and 56 Mexican American (31 men, 25 women) undergraduates attending a mid-sized public university in the Pacific Northwest. Variables measured included control of learning beliefs, self-efficacy for learning and performance, peer learning, help seeking, and time and study environment. For white students no significant gender differences were found. However, for Mexican American students the multivariate effect of gender was significant, (Wilk’s lambda = .73, F= 3.24, P < .05, Partial Eta squared = .27). Follow-up tests revealed that men scored higher than females on self-efficacy for learning and performance and time study environment . The effect sizes for both were in the large range. These results add to our knowledge base regarding gender differences in learning and study strategies among students from diverse ethnic groups. In this sample, Mexican American men scored higher than women in the area of self-efficacy for learning and performance and time study environment.