Title

Undergraduate Students' Self-Assessment of Study Skills: A Preliminary Analysis

Presenter Information

Suzanne Little
Carolyn Petersen

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to investigate study habits of undergraduate students enrolled in a regional university in the Pacific Northwest. Previous research has demonstrated that a better understanding of the study habits of undergraduate students may assist in developing programs to support student success and in increasing retention and completion rates of students. Participants included more than 550 undergraduate students attending a regional university in Washington State. Preliminary analyses indicated that more than 70 percent of participants identified as female, and more than 45 percent of participants were classified as freshmen. More than half of participants reported living on-campus, and nearly 80 percent of participants identify as Caucasian. Further analyses will be presented including the potential impacts of student employment and peer interactions on study skills, and student use of on-campus resources such as writing and math centers and computer labs will be discussed. Additionally, suggestions for increasing student study skills and success will be discussed.

Poster Number

45

Faculty Mentor(s)

Suzanne Little

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 16th, 2:15 PM May 16th, 4:44 PM

Undergraduate Students' Self-Assessment of Study Skills: A Preliminary Analysis

SURC Ballroom C/D

The purpose of the current study was to investigate study habits of undergraduate students enrolled in a regional university in the Pacific Northwest. Previous research has demonstrated that a better understanding of the study habits of undergraduate students may assist in developing programs to support student success and in increasing retention and completion rates of students. Participants included more than 550 undergraduate students attending a regional university in Washington State. Preliminary analyses indicated that more than 70 percent of participants identified as female, and more than 45 percent of participants were classified as freshmen. More than half of participants reported living on-campus, and nearly 80 percent of participants identify as Caucasian. Further analyses will be presented including the potential impacts of student employment and peer interactions on study skills, and student use of on-campus resources such as writing and math centers and computer labs will be discussed. Additionally, suggestions for increasing student study skills and success will be discussed.