Title

Challenges of College Students with Asperger’s Syndrome

Presenter Information

Shu-Fei Tsai

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Room 201

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Asperger's Syndrome, Support system, Self-Advocacy

Abstract

To date, there are more and more students with Asperger’s syndrome attending colleges. Because their communication and interaction impairments, they may feel social isolated, social anxiety and loneliness (White, Ollendick, & Bray, 2011). They also have challenges in multiple areas, such as academics, time management, independent living skills, and study skills (Adreon & Durocher, 2007). In order to get support and service in higher education, students with Asperger’s syndrome need to disclose their disability to their college’s office of disability services. Moreover, not every instructor and other students have the knowledge of Asperger’s syndrome. As a result, students with Asperger’s syndrome need to advocate for themselves (Eckes & Ochoa, 2005) and let instructors know what accommodations they need. Responding to their experiences, possible coping skills and support will be discussed in this presentation. The information will assist colleges in development of the support system and delivery of effective services to students with Asperger’s syndrome.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Tsai, Shu-Fei

Additional Mentoring Department

Language, Literacy, and Special Education

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May 15th, 12:00 PM May 15th, 12:20 PM

Challenges of College Students with Asperger’s Syndrome

SURC Room 201

To date, there are more and more students with Asperger’s syndrome attending colleges. Because their communication and interaction impairments, they may feel social isolated, social anxiety and loneliness (White, Ollendick, & Bray, 2011). They also have challenges in multiple areas, such as academics, time management, independent living skills, and study skills (Adreon & Durocher, 2007). In order to get support and service in higher education, students with Asperger’s syndrome need to disclose their disability to their college’s office of disability services. Moreover, not every instructor and other students have the knowledge of Asperger’s syndrome. As a result, students with Asperger’s syndrome need to advocate for themselves (Eckes & Ochoa, 2005) and let instructors know what accommodations they need. Responding to their experiences, possible coping skills and support will be discussed in this presentation. The information will assist colleges in development of the support system and delivery of effective services to students with Asperger’s syndrome.