Title

Central Washington University Fuel Cell

Presenter Information

Brian Congdon

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Hydrogen, Renewable, Energy

Abstract

The goal of the Central Washington University Fuel Cell project is to promote fuel cell technology and utilization of hydrogen as an alternative and viable fuel source. Because of the inherent limit of hydrocarbon based fuels, there is a growing desire for cleaner, more abundant fuel sources. The Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell utilizes hydrogen and oxygen to create electricity, yielding only H20 and occasionally liquid H2. The use of hydrogen as an alternative fuel is embodied in the term “hydrogen economy” which the US Department of Energy has planned to be in place by 2040-2050. For this project, Central Washington University was provided a ReliOn T-2000 fuel cell power system. This presentation represents the culmination of the first three stages of the project. First, the assembly and christening of the fuel cell itself; second, the integration of fuel, current, and voltage sensors to allow for data acquisition; and third, the recording and storage of data for future study.

Poster Number

10

Faculty Mentor(s)

Holden, Lad

Additional Mentoring Department

Engineering Technologies, Safety, and Construction

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May 15th, 2:29 PM May 15th, 5:00 PM

Central Washington University Fuel Cell

SURC Ballroom C/D

The goal of the Central Washington University Fuel Cell project is to promote fuel cell technology and utilization of hydrogen as an alternative and viable fuel source. Because of the inherent limit of hydrocarbon based fuels, there is a growing desire for cleaner, more abundant fuel sources. The Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell utilizes hydrogen and oxygen to create electricity, yielding only H20 and occasionally liquid H2. The use of hydrogen as an alternative fuel is embodied in the term “hydrogen economy” which the US Department of Energy has planned to be in place by 2040-2050. For this project, Central Washington University was provided a ReliOn T-2000 fuel cell power system. This presentation represents the culmination of the first three stages of the project. First, the assembly and christening of the fuel cell itself; second, the integration of fuel, current, and voltage sensors to allow for data acquisition; and third, the recording and storage of data for future study.