Title

Electronic Device Usage and Distraction In Lectures and Driving

Presenter Information

Suzanne Lacour
Elena Larrabee

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Electronics, Distraction, Learning

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the usage of electronic devices (such as cellphones, tablets, and laptops) by CWU students for non-classroom purposes and while driving. Non-classroom purposes is defined as non-course specific activities during lecture. The driving portion of the survey was focused only on the vehicle operator. A general survey regarding usage in both areas was administered online, including sections on individual perceptions of the distractions the usage of these devices poses both to the individual and to others. The survey focused on students over the age of 18, with heaviest participation from members of the psychology department but drawing from numerous others. Preliminary results mirror similar studies conducted at other universities and indicate a high percentage of electronic device usage in the classroom. Findings highlight the importance for academics to get a better understanding of how and why students feel the need to be online for non-academic reasons.

Poster Number

48

Faculty Mentor(s)

Greenwald, Ralf

Additional Mentoring Department

Psychology

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May 15th, 2:29 PM May 15th, 5:00 PM

Electronic Device Usage and Distraction In Lectures and Driving

SURC Ballroom C/D

The purpose of this study was to examine the usage of electronic devices (such as cellphones, tablets, and laptops) by CWU students for non-classroom purposes and while driving. Non-classroom purposes is defined as non-course specific activities during lecture. The driving portion of the survey was focused only on the vehicle operator. A general survey regarding usage in both areas was administered online, including sections on individual perceptions of the distractions the usage of these devices poses both to the individual and to others. The survey focused on students over the age of 18, with heaviest participation from members of the psychology department but drawing from numerous others. Preliminary results mirror similar studies conducted at other universities and indicate a high percentage of electronic device usage in the classroom. Findings highlight the importance for academics to get a better understanding of how and why students feel the need to be online for non-academic reasons.