Title

The Effects of Relationship Initiation on Relationship Satisfaction

Presenter Information

Lindsay Montgomery
Gabriela Logan

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Relationships, Initiation, Satisfaction

Abstract

This study examined the impact of initiation behaviors on romantic relationships. In an online survey, we asked participants whether they or their partner initiated certain behaviors and conversations within both past and present relationships. We then compared those who reported initiating to those who reported their partner initiated on levels of satisfaction and frequency of payment on dates. In our sample of 147 young adults (ages 18-25), we found that those who said, “I love you” first were more generally satisfied within the relationship. We also found that the partner who initiated contact was more satisfied with the level of emotional support and levels of communication. Those who initiated contact also reported that they paid while on dates more consistently throughout the duration of the relationship as well. The Principle of Least Interest theory states the idea that the person who displays the least care/interest in the relationship is the more powerful partner. Based on this principle, we expected that the non-initiating partner would be more satisfied in the relationship, as that partner would have more power; however, our findings directly contradicted this hypothesis, suggesting a need for refinement of this theoretical framework. Overall, research on relationship initiation is relatively scarce in the field of family science and should be further explored to determine its impact on all aspects of relationship satisfaction.

Poster Number

36

Faculty Mentor(s)

Feeney, Sarah

Additional Mentoring Department

Family and Consumer Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 15th, 2:29 PM May 15th, 5:00 PM

The Effects of Relationship Initiation on Relationship Satisfaction

SURC Ballroom C/D

This study examined the impact of initiation behaviors on romantic relationships. In an online survey, we asked participants whether they or their partner initiated certain behaviors and conversations within both past and present relationships. We then compared those who reported initiating to those who reported their partner initiated on levels of satisfaction and frequency of payment on dates. In our sample of 147 young adults (ages 18-25), we found that those who said, “I love you” first were more generally satisfied within the relationship. We also found that the partner who initiated contact was more satisfied with the level of emotional support and levels of communication. Those who initiated contact also reported that they paid while on dates more consistently throughout the duration of the relationship as well. The Principle of Least Interest theory states the idea that the person who displays the least care/interest in the relationship is the more powerful partner. Based on this principle, we expected that the non-initiating partner would be more satisfied in the relationship, as that partner would have more power; however, our findings directly contradicted this hypothesis, suggesting a need for refinement of this theoretical framework. Overall, research on relationship initiation is relatively scarce in the field of family science and should be further explored to determine its impact on all aspects of relationship satisfaction.