Title

Artificial selection on an inducible, stably inherited defensive trait in Yellow Monkeyflower

Presenter Information

Sam Neuffer

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

Epigenetic inheritance, Genomic studies, artificial selection

Abstract

Organisms often respond to environmental challenges by altering their physical traits. Surprisingly, some environmentally-induced traits can be inherited by subsequent generations–a phenomenon known as epigenetic inheritance. Mimulus guttatus (Yellow Monkeyflower) exhibits genetic variation in three interrelated traits: baseline production of trichomes (sticky hairs that deter insects), degree to which trichome production increases in response to leaf damage, and epigenetic inheritance of this response. In order to characterize the genetic basis of these three traits, we have produced replicate populations artificially selected for either high baseline trichome production or high response to damage. Preliminary results show a strong response to selection. We plan to sequence DNA from each population in order to identify genomic regions associated with each trait, and to determine to what degree the three traits share a genetic basis. The results will elucidate the relationship between genetic and epigenetic variation in an ecologically significant trait.

Poster Number

29

Faculty Mentor(s)

Scoville, Alison

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 15th, 8:30 AM May 15th, 11:00 AM

Artificial selection on an inducible, stably inherited defensive trait in Yellow Monkeyflower

SURC Ballroom C/D

Organisms often respond to environmental challenges by altering their physical traits. Surprisingly, some environmentally-induced traits can be inherited by subsequent generations–a phenomenon known as epigenetic inheritance. Mimulus guttatus (Yellow Monkeyflower) exhibits genetic variation in three interrelated traits: baseline production of trichomes (sticky hairs that deter insects), degree to which trichome production increases in response to leaf damage, and epigenetic inheritance of this response. In order to characterize the genetic basis of these three traits, we have produced replicate populations artificially selected for either high baseline trichome production or high response to damage. Preliminary results show a strong response to selection. We plan to sequence DNA from each population in order to identify genomic regions associated with each trait, and to determine to what degree the three traits share a genetic basis. The results will elucidate the relationship between genetic and epigenetic variation in an ecologically significant trait.