Title

Species Identification through aDNA Barcode Analysis of Salmon Bones of Central Washington Archaeological Sites

Presenter Information

Victoria Frederickson

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

15-5-2014

End Date

15-5-2014

Keywords

archaeology, molecular, DNA

Abstract

Salmon bones found at archaeological sites have historically been very difficult to identify, by osteometric identification. While research has been conducted that uses DNA comparison to validate osteometric information of salmon species, research on the subject of species identification that uses DNA as the primary source of identification of salmon bones from archaeological sites has yet to be fully studied. I am using the DNA sequence of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome B (cytB) locus in an effort to identify the species of salmon bones found at archaeological sites in Washington State. Using PCR to amplify cytB, I have been able to identify the species of salmon from modern specimens and I am currently attempting to amplify the cyt locus from ancient salmon remains. This technique when applied to archaeological faunal specimens could be used to determine species identification of specimens that have been historically problematic to identify by other methods.

Poster Number

39

Faculty Mentor(s)

Lorenz, Joseph

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology and Museum Studies

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May 15th, 11:30 AM May 15th, 2:00 PM

Species Identification through aDNA Barcode Analysis of Salmon Bones of Central Washington Archaeological Sites

SURC Ballroom C/D

Salmon bones found at archaeological sites have historically been very difficult to identify, by osteometric identification. While research has been conducted that uses DNA comparison to validate osteometric information of salmon species, research on the subject of species identification that uses DNA as the primary source of identification of salmon bones from archaeological sites has yet to be fully studied. I am using the DNA sequence of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome B (cytB) locus in an effort to identify the species of salmon bones found at archaeological sites in Washington State. Using PCR to amplify cytB, I have been able to identify the species of salmon from modern specimens and I am currently attempting to amplify the cyt locus from ancient salmon remains. This technique when applied to archaeological faunal specimens could be used to determine species identification of specimens that have been historically problematic to identify by other methods.