Title

Evaluation of Trypanosoma cruzi Strains in Jalisco, Mexico

Presenter Information

Uyen Nguyen
Daniel Beck
Analiese Wenger

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 140

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Trypanosoma Cruzi, TcI, Mexico

Abstract

Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is a single-celled flagellated parasite of mammals, including humans. Chagas disease is endemic throughout much of Mexico, Central and South America where an estimated eight million people are infected. The disease is transmitted by infected triatomine bugs, a blood-sucking insect. T. cruzi exists in at least seven unique clonal strains circulating between wild or domestic mammals and triatomine bugs. The strains are found in distinct areas and are associated with different disease pathologies in humans. Each strain can be further divided into discrete genotypes using sequence analysis. The primary objective of this research is to evaluate the T. cruzi strains and genotypes found in and around the dry tropical forest at Estación de Biología Chamela (EBCh) in Jalisco, Mexico. Jalisco is known to have the highest Chagas infection rate in Mexico. Triatomine bugs were collected by hand and using pitfall traps at EBCh. The gut contents were placed on FTA paper, which renders any parasites non-infectious and preserves the parasite’s DNA for testing upon return to Central Washington University. Two common gene fragments of parasite DNA, TcSC5D and intergenic region of mini-exon, were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify T. cruzi strains. Each T. cruzi positive sample was sequenced to determine the parasite genotypes. DNA sequences were analyzed using a ClustalW program. Initial results demonstrate that the T. cruzi strain at EBCh is restricted to TcI. This research will aid in a better understanding of Chagas disease infection dynamics in Jalisco, Mexico.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Gabrielle Stryker

Department/Program

Biological Sciences

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 21st, 3:20 PM May 21st, 3:40 PM

Evaluation of Trypanosoma cruzi Strains in Jalisco, Mexico

SURC 140

Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is a single-celled flagellated parasite of mammals, including humans. Chagas disease is endemic throughout much of Mexico, Central and South America where an estimated eight million people are infected. The disease is transmitted by infected triatomine bugs, a blood-sucking insect. T. cruzi exists in at least seven unique clonal strains circulating between wild or domestic mammals and triatomine bugs. The strains are found in distinct areas and are associated with different disease pathologies in humans. Each strain can be further divided into discrete genotypes using sequence analysis. The primary objective of this research is to evaluate the T. cruzi strains and genotypes found in and around the dry tropical forest at Estación de Biología Chamela (EBCh) in Jalisco, Mexico. Jalisco is known to have the highest Chagas infection rate in Mexico. Triatomine bugs were collected by hand and using pitfall traps at EBCh. The gut contents were placed on FTA paper, which renders any parasites non-infectious and preserves the parasite’s DNA for testing upon return to Central Washington University. Two common gene fragments of parasite DNA, TcSC5D and intergenic region of mini-exon, were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify T. cruzi strains. Each T. cruzi positive sample was sequenced to determine the parasite genotypes. DNA sequences were analyzed using a ClustalW program. Initial results demonstrate that the T. cruzi strain at EBCh is restricted to TcI. This research will aid in a better understanding of Chagas disease infection dynamics in Jalisco, Mexico.