Title

Barriers to Breast and Cervical Cancer Screenings for Underserved Women: Results From the Health Information National Trends Survey

Presenter Information

Janelle Wylie

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 201

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Women, Prevention, Screenings

Abstract

Breast and cervical cancer screenings are effective early detection measures for reducing cancer mortality among women. Following the United States Preventative Services Task Force guidelines, this study aims to examine the utilization of the recommended mammogram and cervical cancer screenings among subgroups of women using the Health Information National Trends (HINTS) dataset. We used the most recent iteration of the HINTS Cycle 3 survey to conduct unpaired t-tests and multiple regression models of mammogram rates among women over age 50, n=1,105, and cervical cancer screening rates among women age 21-65, n=1,353. It was found that nearly one in four women over age 50 did not receive the recommended mammogram, while 19 percent of women age 21 to 65 did not get the recommended cervical cancer screening. Age, p<0.001 and p<0.001, being unemployed, p=0.033 and p=0.047), being uninsured, p<0.001 and p<0.001, not having a regular provider, p<0.001 and p<0.001, having less than a college degree, p<0.001 and p=0.001, and not being married, p<0.001 and p<0.001, were all associated with not receiving the recommended mammogram or cervical cancer screening, respectively. Compared to uninsured women, those who have health insurance are 1.93 times more likely to receive a mammogram, p=0.042, and 2.45 times more likely to receive a cervical cancer screening, p=0.033, when accounting for all covariates in the multivariate models. Understanding which sub-groups of women are less likely to receive essential cancer screenings will help guide public health interventions aimed at improving early detection among at-risk women.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Tishra Beeson

Department/Program

Physical Education, School & Public Health

Additional Mentoring Department

Physical Education, School & Public Health

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 21st, 10:00 AM May 21st, 10:20 AM

Barriers to Breast and Cervical Cancer Screenings for Underserved Women: Results From the Health Information National Trends Survey

SURC 201

Breast and cervical cancer screenings are effective early detection measures for reducing cancer mortality among women. Following the United States Preventative Services Task Force guidelines, this study aims to examine the utilization of the recommended mammogram and cervical cancer screenings among subgroups of women using the Health Information National Trends (HINTS) dataset. We used the most recent iteration of the HINTS Cycle 3 survey to conduct unpaired t-tests and multiple regression models of mammogram rates among women over age 50, n=1,105, and cervical cancer screening rates among women age 21-65, n=1,353. It was found that nearly one in four women over age 50 did not receive the recommended mammogram, while 19 percent of women age 21 to 65 did not get the recommended cervical cancer screening. Age, p<0.001 and p<0.001, being unemployed, p=0.033 and p=0.047), being uninsured, p<0.001 and p<0.001, not having a regular provider, p<0.001 and p<0.001, having less than a college degree, p<0.001 and p=0.001, and not being married, p<0.001 and p<0.001, were all associated with not receiving the recommended mammogram or cervical cancer screening, respectively. Compared to uninsured women, those who have health insurance are 1.93 times more likely to receive a mammogram, p=0.042, and 2.45 times more likely to receive a cervical cancer screening, p=0.033, when accounting for all covariates in the multivariate models. Understanding which sub-groups of women are less likely to receive essential cancer screenings will help guide public health interventions aimed at improving early detection among at-risk women.