Title

Learning in Museums

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

Ellensburg

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Museums, Informal Education, STEM, STE(A)M, Community Engagment, Service Learning

Abstract

Museum Studies students have been developing innovative lesson plans geared towards K-12, college, and community visitors to the Museum of Culture and Environment, which emphasize STE(A)M (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) educational programs. This panel showcases students’ work in creating, implementing, and assessing educational strategies in the museum. We have been especially interested in activities that emphasize creative problem solving and hands on engagement by museum visitors of all ages. Student projects include: a large format puzzle about the Columbia Mammoth; pop music as a strategy for reflecting on chemical dependency, visual arts workshops in reflecting on homelessness and “what is home”; an interactive space evoking a homeless encampment to teach about life on the streets; an interactive tour of exhibition on heroin and homelessness; using puppetry to reflect on eco-connectivity across wildlife passages; an odor wheel using different chemicals to identify problems in compost piles; and teaching echolocation through auditory cues.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Mark Auslander, J. Hope Amason

Department/Program

Anthropology & Museum Studies

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology & Museum Studies

Additional Mentoring Department

Museum of Culture and Environment

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May 21st, 12:00 AM May 21st, 12:00 AM

Learning in Museums

Ellensburg

Museum Studies students have been developing innovative lesson plans geared towards K-12, college, and community visitors to the Museum of Culture and Environment, which emphasize STE(A)M (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) educational programs. This panel showcases students’ work in creating, implementing, and assessing educational strategies in the museum. We have been especially interested in activities that emphasize creative problem solving and hands on engagement by museum visitors of all ages. Student projects include: a large format puzzle about the Columbia Mammoth; pop music as a strategy for reflecting on chemical dependency, visual arts workshops in reflecting on homelessness and “what is home”; an interactive space evoking a homeless encampment to teach about life on the streets; an interactive tour of exhibition on heroin and homelessness; using puppetry to reflect on eco-connectivity across wildlife passages; an odor wheel using different chemicals to identify problems in compost piles; and teaching echolocation through auditory cues.