Title

Cancer Survivor Rehabilitation Program: Biopsychosocial Outcomes and the Influence of Initial Fitness Levels

Presenter Information

Samantha Mulroy

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Cancer Survivor Rehabilitation, Quality of Life, Initial Fitness Level

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was two-fold: 1) to explore the effect of a comprehensive cancer rehabilitation program on biopsychosocial measures; and 2) to determine if biopsychosocial outcomes are related to initial fitness values. Research has examined the relationship between participation in physical activity and improvement in quality of life in cancer survivors. Additionally, it has been established that initial fitness level of healthy adults effects the magnitude of improvement after aerobic exercise training; however, it is unclear if similar effects are observed in older adults and cancer survivors. The evaluation of the potential relationship between initial fitness levels and biopsychosocial response has not been explored in healthy or clinical populations. Fifty-one post-treatment cancer survivors of all cancer types were assigned to the treatment group in a pre-post quasi-experimental design. The 12-week comprehensive rehabilitation program consisted of two 90-minute sessions per week. Each session was comprised of three components: an educational activity, cardiovascular training, and strength and flexibility training. Dependent measures included: aerobic capacity, body fat percent, handgrip strength, quality of life, Schwartz Fatigue Scale, and the Linear Analogue Self-Assessment Scale (LASA). A two-way analysis of variance demonstrated no differences between the two levels of fitness. A paired t-test revealed statistically significant differences pre- and post-program among all dependent variables with the exception of nonsignificant findings of anxiety and anger LASA scale measures. Overall, a comprehensive rehabilitation program for cancer survivors improves biopsychosocial outcomes and is not influenced by the participant’s initial fitness level.

Poster Number

21

Faculty Mentor(s)

Tim Burnham

Department/Program

Nutrition, Exercise & Health Science

Additional Mentoring Department

Nutrition, Exercise & Health Science

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May 21st, 11:30 AM May 21st, 2:00 PM

Cancer Survivor Rehabilitation Program: Biopsychosocial Outcomes and the Influence of Initial Fitness Levels

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

The purpose of the present study was two-fold: 1) to explore the effect of a comprehensive cancer rehabilitation program on biopsychosocial measures; and 2) to determine if biopsychosocial outcomes are related to initial fitness values. Research has examined the relationship between participation in physical activity and improvement in quality of life in cancer survivors. Additionally, it has been established that initial fitness level of healthy adults effects the magnitude of improvement after aerobic exercise training; however, it is unclear if similar effects are observed in older adults and cancer survivors. The evaluation of the potential relationship between initial fitness levels and biopsychosocial response has not been explored in healthy or clinical populations. Fifty-one post-treatment cancer survivors of all cancer types were assigned to the treatment group in a pre-post quasi-experimental design. The 12-week comprehensive rehabilitation program consisted of two 90-minute sessions per week. Each session was comprised of three components: an educational activity, cardiovascular training, and strength and flexibility training. Dependent measures included: aerobic capacity, body fat percent, handgrip strength, quality of life, Schwartz Fatigue Scale, and the Linear Analogue Self-Assessment Scale (LASA). A two-way analysis of variance demonstrated no differences between the two levels of fitness. A paired t-test revealed statistically significant differences pre- and post-program among all dependent variables with the exception of nonsignificant findings of anxiety and anger LASA scale measures. Overall, a comprehensive rehabilitation program for cancer survivors improves biopsychosocial outcomes and is not influenced by the participant’s initial fitness level.