Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Iron Status, Endurance Athletes, Dietary Intake

Abstract

A chief concern for female endurance athletes is adequate iron status which is partially determined by iron and vitamin C intake. This study examines the impact of diet on iron intake in adolescent female cross country runners. Animal-based iron sources are recognized as being better absorbed and more bioavailable than non-animal-based sources. Additionally, vitamin C promotes iron absorption. In this study, the independent variable was defined as a vegetarian diet (one excluding meat, fish, and poultry), with the control being a non-vegetarian diet. The hypothesis was that vegetarian cross country runners would have lower mean iron intakes than non-vegetarians. Data were collected via a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and a 3-Day Diet Log (3DL) provided to the subjects. Scores based on servings per week were assigned to the FFQ to create an estimate of each subject's daily iron and vitamin C intake. 3DLs were analyzed using ESHA Research Solutions Food Processor Diet Analysis software to form a representative picture of various nutrients over time, with the primary focus on iron and vitamin C. Permutation tests were used to analyze the dietary data. No significant differences in average iron intake or other key nutrients were found to exist between groups for 3DL data. A commonly attended running camp during the administration of this study may have been a factor. Analysis of the FFQ dietary data, indicating longer term intakes, revealed vegetarians had statistically significant higher intakes of vitamin C, p=0.0389, and iron, p=0.0135, than did non-vegetarians.

Poster Number

32

Faculty Mentor(s)

Ethan Bergman, Tim Englund

Department/Program

Nutrition, Exercise & Health Science

Additional Mentoring Department

Nutrition, Exercise & Health Science

Additional Mentoring Department

Mathematics

Included in

Nutrition Commons

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May 21st, 11:30 AM May 21st, 2:00 PM

The Effects of a Vegetarian Diet on Dietary Iron Intake in Adolescent Female Endurance Athletes

SURC Ballroom B/C/D

A chief concern for female endurance athletes is adequate iron status which is partially determined by iron and vitamin C intake. This study examines the impact of diet on iron intake in adolescent female cross country runners. Animal-based iron sources are recognized as being better absorbed and more bioavailable than non-animal-based sources. Additionally, vitamin C promotes iron absorption. In this study, the independent variable was defined as a vegetarian diet (one excluding meat, fish, and poultry), with the control being a non-vegetarian diet. The hypothesis was that vegetarian cross country runners would have lower mean iron intakes than non-vegetarians. Data were collected via a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and a 3-Day Diet Log (3DL) provided to the subjects. Scores based on servings per week were assigned to the FFQ to create an estimate of each subject's daily iron and vitamin C intake. 3DLs were analyzed using ESHA Research Solutions Food Processor Diet Analysis software to form a representative picture of various nutrients over time, with the primary focus on iron and vitamin C. Permutation tests were used to analyze the dietary data. No significant differences in average iron intake or other key nutrients were found to exist between groups for 3DL data. A commonly attended running camp during the administration of this study may have been a factor. Analysis of the FFQ dietary data, indicating longer term intakes, revealed vegetarians had statistically significant higher intakes of vitamin C, p=0.0389, and iron, p=0.0135, than did non-vegetarians.