Title

Shopping While Non-White in Ellensburg, WA

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

15-5-2019

End Date

15-5-2019

Abstract

Using self-report, researchers have investigated minority experiences while shopping or eating out at various establishments in the US and elsewhere around the world. These studies have shown that in general, minorities, especially Blacks, report that they are not treated with the same respect or care as whites, are followed more frequently than whites, and frequently are not comfortable in non-minority owned establishments. There is little actual field research investigating minority experiences while shopping or eating out, but the few we have found show similar results. For example, the body language of white waitstaff often is less warm with minority customers (e.g., less smiling, less eye contact, etc.) than with white customers. In addition, reports from Central Washington University minority students corroborate these results. In the present study, African American, Hispanic, or Caucasian confederates were asked to shop or eat at various stores and restaurants around Ellensburg, WA while independent observers noted the behavior of the staff using a behavior checklist and stopwatches. The purpose of this experiment is to determine if there is a racial bias shown toward minority customers, as reported in casual conversation. The observational results will be presented and discussed.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Marte Fallshore

Department/Program

Psychology

Grace_Pearsons -SOURCE_ Shopping While Non-White in Ellensburg, Washington.pptx (342 kB)
Slides for SOURCE 2019 presentation Pearsons

Additional Files

Grace_Pearsons -SOURCE_ Shopping While Non-White in Ellensburg, Washington.pptx (342 kB)
Slides for SOURCE 2019 presentation Pearsons

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May 15th, 12:00 AM May 15th, 12:00 AM

Shopping While Non-White in Ellensburg, WA

Ellensburg

Using self-report, researchers have investigated minority experiences while shopping or eating out at various establishments in the US and elsewhere around the world. These studies have shown that in general, minorities, especially Blacks, report that they are not treated with the same respect or care as whites, are followed more frequently than whites, and frequently are not comfortable in non-minority owned establishments. There is little actual field research investigating minority experiences while shopping or eating out, but the few we have found show similar results. For example, the body language of white waitstaff often is less warm with minority customers (e.g., less smiling, less eye contact, etc.) than with white customers. In addition, reports from Central Washington University minority students corroborate these results. In the present study, African American, Hispanic, or Caucasian confederates were asked to shop or eat at various stores and restaurants around Ellensburg, WA while independent observers noted the behavior of the staff using a behavior checklist and stopwatches. The purpose of this experiment is to determine if there is a racial bias shown toward minority customers, as reported in casual conversation. The observational results will be presented and discussed.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2019/Oralpres/14