Title

Honoring Voices and Cultural Norms in Collaborative Research with AI/AN Populations: Ethical Approval vs. Ethical Conduct

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Campus where you would like to present

Des Moines

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

14-5-2019

End Date

14-5-2019

Abstract

Substance use and dependence in urban American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities is embedded in a traumatic history, and it is crucial that scientist practitioners implement culturally sensitive perspectives in conducting research. There is a history of abuse of power by researchers that includes circumventing research site access, violating consent, and publishing sensitive results with personal or tribal identifiers. Scholars must actively work to counter this experience, while continuing to advocate for meaningful and rigorous research among AI/AN women. As such, the data collection process becomes an amalgam of institutional and tribal collaboration whereby the researcher must navigate tribal requests for study refinement and ownership of materials while also minimizing researcher vulnerability and fatigue. We will explore the experiences of the principal investigator in endeavoring to uphold the sovereignty and rights of individual tribes and the urban collective AI/AN community, while working within the structure of institutional ethics and rigorous research. Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to explicate cultural considerations in the institutional and tribal review processes with respect to a) research design b) recruitment, c) data collection, and d) dissemination. Developing cultural competency by recognizing gender and cultural differences among urban, emerging adult Native women addresses power imbalances while encouraging a partnership between urban centers and tribal councils in the construction of an empowered, positive identity for recovery.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Liane Pereira

Department/Program

Psychology

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May 14th, 5:00 PM May 14th, 8:00 PM

Honoring Voices and Cultural Norms in Collaborative Research with AI/AN Populations: Ethical Approval vs. Ethical Conduct

Des Moines

Substance use and dependence in urban American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities is embedded in a traumatic history, and it is crucial that scientist practitioners implement culturally sensitive perspectives in conducting research. There is a history of abuse of power by researchers that includes circumventing research site access, violating consent, and publishing sensitive results with personal or tribal identifiers. Scholars must actively work to counter this experience, while continuing to advocate for meaningful and rigorous research among AI/AN women. As such, the data collection process becomes an amalgam of institutional and tribal collaboration whereby the researcher must navigate tribal requests for study refinement and ownership of materials while also minimizing researcher vulnerability and fatigue. We will explore the experiences of the principal investigator in endeavoring to uphold the sovereignty and rights of individual tribes and the urban collective AI/AN community, while working within the structure of institutional ethics and rigorous research. Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to explicate cultural considerations in the institutional and tribal review processes with respect to a) research design b) recruitment, c) data collection, and d) dissemination. Developing cultural competency by recognizing gender and cultural differences among urban, emerging adult Native women addresses power imbalances while encouraging a partnership between urban centers and tribal councils in the construction of an empowered, positive identity for recovery.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2019/Oralpres/2