Title

Development of Procedures for Modifying Variables in the Brewing Process Using Sensory Analysis

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

15-5-2019

End Date

15-5-2019

Abstract

In the beer industry scientific methods and best practices for recipe and process development are rarely shared due to the investment individual companies have in their product. As craft brewing has gained more scientific attention, the industry has the opportunity to experiment more thoroughly on the direct effects of recipe modification. Our experiments serve the purpose of broadening the public understanding of these modifications, and examining the effect on the final product using sensory analysis. Impacts on beer flavor and aroma may be able to be traced back to these specific modifications, therefore through our project we aim to find their direct causes. After preliminary research concerning yeast strain modification, our experiments begin with investigating the effects of variation in fermentation temperatures. For these purposes a single beer is brewed and separated into fermentation vessels to be pitched with yeast of the same strain and amount, while held at different temperatures during fermentation. Upon completion the three variations are evaluated using traditional sensory analysis methods by a panel of students for significant differences in the finished product. Our results will not only indicate whether yeast temperature modification is a viable method of control of beer flavor, but also help us establish processes to improve future brewing ventures. Further experiments will include modifications to the recipe and other processes of brewing. Through collaboration and data analysis we will increase the efficacy and public knowledge of recipe and process development in brewing.

Winner, Outstanding Oral Presentation, College of the Sciences

Faculty Mentor(s)

Eric Foss

Department/Program

Craft Brewery

Darby and Mike.pptx (22669 kB)
Slides for SOURCE 2019 presentation Wedekind

Additional Files

Darby and Mike.pptx (22669 kB)
Slides for SOURCE 2019 presentation Wedekind

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May 15th, 12:00 AM May 15th, 12:00 AM

Development of Procedures for Modifying Variables in the Brewing Process Using Sensory Analysis

Ellensburg

In the beer industry scientific methods and best practices for recipe and process development are rarely shared due to the investment individual companies have in their product. As craft brewing has gained more scientific attention, the industry has the opportunity to experiment more thoroughly on the direct effects of recipe modification. Our experiments serve the purpose of broadening the public understanding of these modifications, and examining the effect on the final product using sensory analysis. Impacts on beer flavor and aroma may be able to be traced back to these specific modifications, therefore through our project we aim to find their direct causes. After preliminary research concerning yeast strain modification, our experiments begin with investigating the effects of variation in fermentation temperatures. For these purposes a single beer is brewed and separated into fermentation vessels to be pitched with yeast of the same strain and amount, while held at different temperatures during fermentation. Upon completion the three variations are evaluated using traditional sensory analysis methods by a panel of students for significant differences in the finished product. Our results will not only indicate whether yeast temperature modification is a viable method of control of beer flavor, but also help us establish processes to improve future brewing ventures. Further experiments will include modifications to the recipe and other processes of brewing. Through collaboration and data analysis we will increase the efficacy and public knowledge of recipe and process development in brewing.

Winner, Outstanding Oral Presentation, College of the Sciences

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2019/Oralpres/49