Title

The Phenotypic Effects of Dihydrotestosterone in the Development of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in a Post-natal Mouse Model

Presenter Information

Jennifer Magana
Silvia Gutierrez

Document Type

Poster

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

15-5-2019

End Date

15-5-2019

Abstract

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common causes of infertility in women of reproductive age. It is an endocrine disorder that is characterized by hyperandrogenism (excess testosterone), lack of ovulation, and the presence of cysts within the ovary. Hyperandrogenism is thought to be the lead cause for PCOS by disrupting hormonal balance and ovarian function. A 90- day dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment showed high expression of two Claudin genes, Cldn 3 and 11. These genes are normally expressed in the brain and the testis. The aim of this study was to induce PCOS over several different time periods in order to better understand the phenotypes and expression of these Cldn genes during the development of PCOS in mice. Treatment times included 10, 21, 35, and 49 days where animals were treated with DHT or placebo controls. In addition to Cldn gene expression the age of vaginal opening (measure of puberty), anal genital distance, body weight and estrus cycle were recorded. Quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze Cldn gene expression within the ovary, and estrous cycle was observed daily and classified between diestrus, proestrus, estrus, and metaestrus. Ovaries were collected at the end of each treatment time, fixed, and stained to observe morphological features. Observations between DHT treated mice and placebo mice suggest that prolonged treatment alters ovarian function and reproductive phenotypes. These observations can be used to further understand the development of PCOS.

Winner, Outstanding Oral Presentation, College of the Sciences.

Faculty Mentor(s)

April Binder

Department/Program

Biological Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 15th, 12:00 AM May 15th, 12:00 AM

The Phenotypic Effects of Dihydrotestosterone in the Development of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in a Post-natal Mouse Model

Ellensburg

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common causes of infertility in women of reproductive age. It is an endocrine disorder that is characterized by hyperandrogenism (excess testosterone), lack of ovulation, and the presence of cysts within the ovary. Hyperandrogenism is thought to be the lead cause for PCOS by disrupting hormonal balance and ovarian function. A 90- day dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment showed high expression of two Claudin genes, Cldn 3 and 11. These genes are normally expressed in the brain and the testis. The aim of this study was to induce PCOS over several different time periods in order to better understand the phenotypes and expression of these Cldn genes during the development of PCOS in mice. Treatment times included 10, 21, 35, and 49 days where animals were treated with DHT or placebo controls. In addition to Cldn gene expression the age of vaginal opening (measure of puberty), anal genital distance, body weight and estrus cycle were recorded. Quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze Cldn gene expression within the ovary, and estrous cycle was observed daily and classified between diestrus, proestrus, estrus, and metaestrus. Ovaries were collected at the end of each treatment time, fixed, and stained to observe morphological features. Observations between DHT treated mice and placebo mice suggest that prolonged treatment alters ovarian function and reproductive phenotypes. These observations can be used to further understand the development of PCOS.

Winner, Outstanding Oral Presentation, College of the Sciences.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2019/Posters/213