Title

Ohana: An Analysis of Family Structure in Popular Instructional Materials

Document Type

Poster

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

18-5-2020

Abstract

In this undergraduate teacher action study, by ignoring different family structures, we are restricting learners to believe there is only one family structure that is important. The idea, morals, and values that we, as individuals, are living by are reflections of dominant family structures. When instructing young students, an educator must think of ways to reflect students’ realities and make them feel visible. By exposing them to a variety of instructional material and classmates’ realities, children have the opportunity of becoming better global citizens. The five movies and five books that I chose to analyze are good representations of varying family structures that are dominant, but oftentimes not valued for the message sent to these children. Frequently the messages that are sent through these movies and books are often overlooked or dismissed due to the fact that they are seen as controversial or excused for being uninformative. If used appropriately, these books and films can challenge the family structure bias. We, as educators can grant students the opportunity to see themselves represented within their education and society.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Susana Flores

Department/Program

Education

Additional Mentoring Department

https://cwu.studentopportunitycenter.com/2020/04/ohana-an-analysis-of-family-structure-in-popular-instructional-materials/

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May 18th, 12:00 PM

Ohana: An Analysis of Family Structure in Popular Instructional Materials

Ellensburg

In this undergraduate teacher action study, by ignoring different family structures, we are restricting learners to believe there is only one family structure that is important. The idea, morals, and values that we, as individuals, are living by are reflections of dominant family structures. When instructing young students, an educator must think of ways to reflect students’ realities and make them feel visible. By exposing them to a variety of instructional material and classmates’ realities, children have the opportunity of becoming better global citizens. The five movies and five books that I chose to analyze are good representations of varying family structures that are dominant, but oftentimes not valued for the message sent to these children. Frequently the messages that are sent through these movies and books are often overlooked or dismissed due to the fact that they are seen as controversial or excused for being uninformative. If used appropriately, these books and films can challenge the family structure bias. We, as educators can grant students the opportunity to see themselves represented within their education and society.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2020/CEPS/6