Title

Sanders Site Archaeology: Feature Identification

Document Type

Poster

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

18-5-2020

Abstract

Following the lead of other student collection analyses this study examines the documentary and artifact evidence for features in six strata. The results of this study can be split into two sections: feature identification and stratigraphic analysis. Results illustrates general activity areas and discrete features including concentrations of bone refuse. Concentrations of bone with spiral fractures represent marrow extraction from deer and deer size long bones. In these concentrations, bones with spiral fractures represent marrow extraction. Most of this subsistence activity dates to about 3000 years ago; however, one feature may date as early as 5000 years. Fauna samples from the lower strata supplement a larger sample analyzed by Endacott and others. This lower strata also contain deer: however, Big Horn sheep (Ovis canadensis) are also present. With additional analysis of other samples, we may be able to document changes in environment, subsistence, and settlement displayed during the Frenchman Springs phase.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Steven Hackenberger

Department/Program

Anthropology & Museum Studies

Additional Mentoring Department

https://cwu.studentopportunitycenter.com/2020/04/sanders-site-archaeology-feature-identification/

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May 18th, 12:00 PM

Sanders Site Archaeology: Feature Identification

Ellensburg

Following the lead of other student collection analyses this study examines the documentary and artifact evidence for features in six strata. The results of this study can be split into two sections: feature identification and stratigraphic analysis. Results illustrates general activity areas and discrete features including concentrations of bone refuse. Concentrations of bone with spiral fractures represent marrow extraction from deer and deer size long bones. In these concentrations, bones with spiral fractures represent marrow extraction. Most of this subsistence activity dates to about 3000 years ago; however, one feature may date as early as 5000 years. Fauna samples from the lower strata supplement a larger sample analyzed by Endacott and others. This lower strata also contain deer: however, Big Horn sheep (Ovis canadensis) are also present. With additional analysis of other samples, we may be able to document changes in environment, subsistence, and settlement displayed during the Frenchman Springs phase.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2020/COTS/3