Title

Using GIS to Map Resource Availability in the East Saddle Mountains, Grant County, WA

Document Type

Poster

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

18-5-2020

Abstract

Humans have found ways to extract resources from the resource rich upland landscape of the Mid-Columbia Plateau for at least the last 11,000 years. However, due to a century of inconsistently managed projects in the uplands of the Mid-Columbia Plateau, the large datasets required to examine resource extraction methods are uncommon. In order to address this, Central Washington Archaeological Survey (CWAS) produced ten years of methodologically consistent field data from 1998 to 2006 and 2008 while surveying in the East Saddle Mountains. My research will use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to identify both Lomatium habitat and quarry pits within the study area of CWAS field surveys in the East Saddle Mountains. By combining slope, aspect, soil data, and solar analyst, I will create a predictive model for Lomatium habitat. I will also interpret LiDAR data to identify quarry pits, alongside geologic interbeds containing raw toolstone. This information will then be made available for further spatial examination of the relationship between the extensive archaeological record of the East Saddle Mountains created by CWAS and precontact resource extraction.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Sterling Quinn

Department/Program

Geography

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May 18th, 12:00 PM

Using GIS to Map Resource Availability in the East Saddle Mountains, Grant County, WA

Ellensburg

Humans have found ways to extract resources from the resource rich upland landscape of the Mid-Columbia Plateau for at least the last 11,000 years. However, due to a century of inconsistently managed projects in the uplands of the Mid-Columbia Plateau, the large datasets required to examine resource extraction methods are uncommon. In order to address this, Central Washington Archaeological Survey (CWAS) produced ten years of methodologically consistent field data from 1998 to 2006 and 2008 while surveying in the East Saddle Mountains. My research will use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to identify both Lomatium habitat and quarry pits within the study area of CWAS field surveys in the East Saddle Mountains. By combining slope, aspect, soil data, and solar analyst, I will create a predictive model for Lomatium habitat. I will also interpret LiDAR data to identify quarry pits, alongside geologic interbeds containing raw toolstone. This information will then be made available for further spatial examination of the relationship between the extensive archaeological record of the East Saddle Mountains created by CWAS and precontact resource extraction.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2020/COTS/59