Title

Finding Next Meal: A Research Based Cost/Benefit Analysis of Nutrition Related Programs in the United States

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

16-5-2021

End Date

22-5-2021

Keywords

Nutrition, Low-Income, Cost

Abstract

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found, in a survey based study, that 88% of adults in the United States do not meet the required daily intake of fruits and 91% do not meet the required daily intake of vegetables. Missing out on substantial daily consumption of fruits and vegetables can increase risk for and exacerbate chronic diseases including diabetes and heart disease. Maintaining a nutritious diet has numerous benefits; however many Americans are simply unable to afford it. The Feeding America organization predicted that, due to economic and employment changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic, more than 35 million people in the United States (US) could be food insecure right now. Feeding America defines food insecure as households that either had to change the variety and appeal of their diets while maintaining the amount consumed or households where at least one member had to significantly change their eating patterns and/or decrease their food consumption due to lack of resources. In the United States there are many nutrition related programs with themes ranging from access to nutritious food, food purchase assistance, and food provided through education. Utilizing information gathered from federal departments and offices and supplemented by other credible sources when necessary, selected programs will be analyzed for their benefits to Americans and their monetary cost per capita to draw a final conclusion regarding what types of programs are the most nutritionally beneficial and the cost per capita of funding.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Yvonne Chueh

Department/Program

Mathematics

Additional Mentoring Department

Actuarial Science

Additional Mentoring Department

https://cwu.studentopportunitycenter.com/finding-next-meal-a-research-based-cost-benefit-analysis-of-nutrition-related-programs-in-the-united-states/

Share

COinS
 
May 16th, 12:00 PM May 22nd, 12:00 PM

Finding Next Meal: A Research Based Cost/Benefit Analysis of Nutrition Related Programs in the United States

Ellensburg

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found, in a survey based study, that 88% of adults in the United States do not meet the required daily intake of fruits and 91% do not meet the required daily intake of vegetables. Missing out on substantial daily consumption of fruits and vegetables can increase risk for and exacerbate chronic diseases including diabetes and heart disease. Maintaining a nutritious diet has numerous benefits; however many Americans are simply unable to afford it. The Feeding America organization predicted that, due to economic and employment changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic, more than 35 million people in the United States (US) could be food insecure right now. Feeding America defines food insecure as households that either had to change the variety and appeal of their diets while maintaining the amount consumed or households where at least one member had to significantly change their eating patterns and/or decrease their food consumption due to lack of resources. In the United States there are many nutrition related programs with themes ranging from access to nutritious food, food purchase assistance, and food provided through education. Utilizing information gathered from federal departments and offices and supplemented by other credible sources when necessary, selected programs will be analyzed for their benefits to Americans and their monetary cost per capita to draw a final conclusion regarding what types of programs are the most nutritionally beneficial and the cost per capita of funding.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2021/COTS/1