Title

Developing a morphometric protocol for identifying and analyzing morphological variability in stone tools

Document Type

Poster

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

16-5-2021

End Date

22-5-2021

Keywords

Morphometrics, Archaeology, Tools

Abstract

Morphometrics analysis of stone tools emphasizes the use of metric data to capture information about tool attributes, such as shape. These techniques are still under development, with some adapted for less reduced tools and others making use of prohibitively expensive technology. This project developed a morphometric analysis technique that is more accessible and attuned to more reduced tools. The artifacts used come from a teaching collection of 18 projectile points from the mid-Columbia River Valley in Kittitas County, Washington. We compare a novel technique to two pre-existing approaches. Our research objective is to identify morphological attributes whose presence, frequency, and distribution are shaped by natural selection in contrast to those traits influenced by cultural transmission. The comparative methods fell short of identifying shape trends but some data suggested there are greater differences in variation around the haft elements than those of the blade and point. The novel method indicated blade shape was a functional element influenced by natural selection and hafting was a stylistic trait influenced by cultural selection.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Patrick McCutcheon

Department/Program

Anthropology and Museum Studies

Share

COinS
 
May 16th, 12:00 PM May 22nd, 12:00 PM

Developing a morphometric protocol for identifying and analyzing morphological variability in stone tools

Ellensburg

Morphometrics analysis of stone tools emphasizes the use of metric data to capture information about tool attributes, such as shape. These techniques are still under development, with some adapted for less reduced tools and others making use of prohibitively expensive technology. This project developed a morphometric analysis technique that is more accessible and attuned to more reduced tools. The artifacts used come from a teaching collection of 18 projectile points from the mid-Columbia River Valley in Kittitas County, Washington. We compare a novel technique to two pre-existing approaches. Our research objective is to identify morphological attributes whose presence, frequency, and distribution are shaped by natural selection in contrast to those traits influenced by cultural transmission. The comparative methods fell short of identifying shape trends but some data suggested there are greater differences in variation around the haft elements than those of the blade and point. The novel method indicated blade shape was a functional element influenced by natural selection and hafting was a stylistic trait influenced by cultural selection.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2021/COTS/5