Title

Investigating Mathematical Hormone Models for Human Ovulation

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

16-5-2021

End Date

22-5-2021

Keywords

Mathematical Modeling, Hormone Modeling, Mathematical Biology

Abstract

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a hormone related health condition that impacts 10% of people who ovulate. This can cause problems with regular ovulation, fertility, and other aspects of biological systems in people who ovulate. As such, having a solid mathematical hormone model could lead to better understanding of PCOS, its impacts, and treatment. Unfortunately, many of the methematical hormone models available were created many decades ago. In reviewing previous and more recent work, we see opportunities to update the models to make the more inclusive and accurate. This work started by verifying the ovulation model created by Chen and Ward, providing a base computational model that shows the interaction of hormones in charge of human ovulation. The presentation will focus on the corrections made to this model and plans for further investigation into PCOS. The ulitmate goal is to develope more personal treatment plans for women based on models that account for the diversity in age, race, and other factors that could impact the overall hormone model.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Brandy Wiegers

Department/Program

Mathematics

Additional Mentoring Department

https://cwu.studentopportunitycenter.com/investigating-mathematical-hormone-models-for-human-ovulation/

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COinS
 
May 16th, 12:00 PM May 22nd, 12:00 PM

Investigating Mathematical Hormone Models for Human Ovulation

Ellensburg

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a hormone related health condition that impacts 10% of people who ovulate. This can cause problems with regular ovulation, fertility, and other aspects of biological systems in people who ovulate. As such, having a solid mathematical hormone model could lead to better understanding of PCOS, its impacts, and treatment. Unfortunately, many of the methematical hormone models available were created many decades ago. In reviewing previous and more recent work, we see opportunities to update the models to make the more inclusive and accurate. This work started by verifying the ovulation model created by Chen and Ward, providing a base computational model that shows the interaction of hormones in charge of human ovulation. The presentation will focus on the corrections made to this model and plans for further investigation into PCOS. The ulitmate goal is to develope more personal treatment plans for women based on models that account for the diversity in age, race, and other factors that could impact the overall hormone model.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2021/COTS/70