Title

The Effect of Dietary Factors on the Prevalence of Multimorbidity that Increase the Risk of COVID-19 Severity in U.S. Adults

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Event Website

https://source2022.sched.com/

Start Date

18-5-2022

End Date

18-5-2022

Keywords

Dietary Factors, Multimorbidity, COVID-19

Abstract

Most of the U.S. population is not meeting the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) which puts them at risk for multimorbidity (≥ two risk factors) that increases the risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes. The aim of this project was to investigate how dietary factors affect the risk for multimorbidity. This project was an observational cross-sectional study, using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey’s (NHANES) questionnaire, laboratory, examination, and dietary data from the years 2015-2018. Data from 10,530 subjects, ≥ 20 years of age, non-pregnant and/or lactating were analyzed. Underlying medical conditions identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were quantified and assessed for prevalence of multimorbidity. Rao-Scott chi-squared analysis was used to determine significant differences in the prevalence of multimorbidity. Forty-five percent of the population had multimorbidity. Those who did not meet recommendations for saturated fat and fiber intake had a higher prevalence of multimorbidity (46.3% and 45.8%, respectively). Those who did not meet recommendations for alcohol intake had a lower prevalence of multimorbidity (42.8%). Odds ratios for multimorbidity was established for those who did not meet the DGA compared to those who did. Fiber: (OR 1.4, p ≤ 0.0001); Saturated Fat: (OR 1.13, p = 0.016); Alcohol: (OR 0.85, p = 0.042). Sodium and total sugar intake had no significant effect on multimorbidity. The results of this study indicate that those who did not meet the fiber and saturated fat DGA recommendations may be at an increased risk for multimorbidity that increases the risk of COVID-19.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dana Ogan, David Gee, Susan Hawk

Department/Program

Food Science and Nutrition

Additional Mentoring Department

Food Science and Nutrition

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May 18th, 12:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 AM

The Effect of Dietary Factors on the Prevalence of Multimorbidity that Increase the Risk of COVID-19 Severity in U.S. Adults

Most of the U.S. population is not meeting the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) which puts them at risk for multimorbidity (≥ two risk factors) that increases the risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes. The aim of this project was to investigate how dietary factors affect the risk for multimorbidity. This project was an observational cross-sectional study, using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey’s (NHANES) questionnaire, laboratory, examination, and dietary data from the years 2015-2018. Data from 10,530 subjects, ≥ 20 years of age, non-pregnant and/or lactating were analyzed. Underlying medical conditions identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were quantified and assessed for prevalence of multimorbidity. Rao-Scott chi-squared analysis was used to determine significant differences in the prevalence of multimorbidity. Forty-five percent of the population had multimorbidity. Those who did not meet recommendations for saturated fat and fiber intake had a higher prevalence of multimorbidity (46.3% and 45.8%, respectively). Those who did not meet recommendations for alcohol intake had a lower prevalence of multimorbidity (42.8%). Odds ratios for multimorbidity was established for those who did not meet the DGA compared to those who did. Fiber: (OR 1.4, p ≤ 0.0001); Saturated Fat: (OR 1.13, p = 0.016); Alcohol: (OR 0.85, p = 0.042). Sodium and total sugar intake had no significant effect on multimorbidity. The results of this study indicate that those who did not meet the fiber and saturated fat DGA recommendations may be at an increased risk for multimorbidity that increases the risk of COVID-19.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2022/CEPS/10